Asian wildlife crisis breeds new ethic

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, December 1998:

BANGKOK, Thailand; BITUNG, Indonesia;
HONG KONG, China; KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia– –
Rapidly building the biggest anti-poaching force in the world,
with a budget of next to nothing, environment and public
health minister Datuk Amar James Wong of Sarawak state,
Malaysia, on December 3 asked the state forestry department
to expedite the appointment of another 1,000 volunteer deputy
wildlife rangers, to reinforce the efforts of the 4,500 volunteer
deputies already on duty.
Wong also asked the Sarawak Timber Association to
support the addition of timber camp managers to the volunteer
deputy force.
“Village elders, national guard members, and councillors
will likewise be recruited,” Wong pledged.
The timber association has already sponsored publication
of a manual for the volunteer deputies.
Wong’s idea is to give a broad portion of the responsible
citizenry of Malaysia an active role in upholding wildlife
protection.

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Near Neanderthal, past and present

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 1998:

The Ice Man, the 5,200-year-old
set of remains found in the Italian Alps in
1991, was a vegetarian, University of
V i r g i n i a professor of environmental science
Stephen A. Macko on October 26 told the
annual conference of the Geological Society
of America. “You are what you eat, and
clues to what people ate thousands of years
ago are in their hair,” Macko explained to the
Toronto gathering. Analyzing the Ice Man’s
hair, Macko found that contrary to the initial
theory that he was a hunter, “There is little
evidence he ate meat––and that was true for
some significant time, at least months if not
years before his death.”

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Meatless goes mainstream

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

by Henry Spira, founder, Coalition for Non-Violent Food

It would be difficult to imagine a more
mainstream endorsement of the meatless lifestyle
than came in June 1998 in the latest edition of Dr.
Spock’s Baby and Child Care. The perennial best
seller grabbed national headlines when the world’s
leading pediatrician recommended that children be
raised on a vegan diet.
Yet this is just one among many current
opportunities to inspire the public to adopt the
meatless/less-meat lifestyle.
Recognizing the enormous destruction
caused by meat eating, the Sierra Club has joined
the debate on the negative impact of factory farming.

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Veggie shakes, rattle and roll

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

BERKELEY, California––You’ll find few obviously vegan or
vegetarian items on the lengthy menu at Michael’s American Vegetarian
Diner––and you’ll see an icon of crossed fingers alongside more than 100
items, including six kinds of hot dog, 10 kinds of burger, and dozens of
alleged chicken, beef, turkey, pork and fish items.
Explains the menu cover, “At Michael’s, all of our food is made
from vegetable, grain, dairy or soy products. There is no meat, poultry, or
fish served or used in this diner.”
“We see this as a transitionary place,” says co-proprietor Dan
Sklar (above, left), who came to veganism as part of a spiritual quest.
“Many of the people coming in here aren’t yet familiar with vegan
or vegetarian food. We think if we can give them familiar textures and
tastes, we can help get them hooked on a healthier and more compassionate
way of life.”

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Excerpts from VEGANISM AS THE PATH TO ANIMAL LIBERATION: PERSONAL VIEWS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, September 1998:

Excerpts from VEGANISM AS THE PATH TO ANIMAL LIBERATION: PERSONAL VIEWS
by Matt Ball, Jack Norris, and Anne Green [selected by Henry Spira, founder, Coalition for Non-Violent Food.]

Two groups of people protest. The
largest group are those recently aware and just
getting involved. Most soon burn out. Their
protesting might have filled a temporary need
to make a public statement, or perhaps when
nothing changes after a few protests they
become disenchanted. The others are veteran
activists––extremely dedicated but few.
Unable to turn our backs on obvious
atrocities, our movement focuses on smallscale
and short-term successes: trying to save
high-profile animals, change business practices
of large corporations, and shame/intimidate
women wearing fur.
What has been gained? A miniscule
fraction of the total number of animals suffering
each year have been spared the most indefensible
deaths. This has not occurred because
of any understanding of the philosphy of animal
liberation, but rather because the companies
were concerned about their bottom line.

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Children and Animals

From: Animal People July/August 1998

Dr. Spock’s last kindness

NEW YORK––Humane childrearing advocate Benjamin Spock, M.D., left some of his most important advice for last:

“We now know that there are harmful effects of a meaty diet,” he stated in the seventh and last edition of Baby And Child Care produced under his direct supervision. “Children can get plenty of protein and iron from vegetables, beans, and other plant foods that avoid the fat and cholesterol that are in animal products.”  Spock also rejected milk. Read more

Sexy vegetarians challenge meat magnates

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

Animal Rights International/Coalition for NonViolent
Food founder Henry Spira offers his Coordinator’s
Report ‘98 free for the asking. Featured articles: Activists
shift focus to factory farming, McDonald’s initiates farm ani –
mal humane program, USDA issues farm animal well-being
report, ARI comments to the USDA, and Campaigns and how
you can help the farm animals. Write to POB 214,
Planetarium Station, New York, NY 10024.
Hot Dinner, a new 50-second Vegetarian Society
ad shown in 250 British cinemas starting in mid-June, “begins
with a melon being stroked,” according to Ruaridh Nicoll of
The Guardian. “A woman’s fingers then roll dough, a pea is
gently tickled in its pod, hot chillis sizzle, a saucepan lets off
steam before rice shoots across a pink plate, a peach is covered
in creme fraiche, and asparagus drips oil.” Said Vegetarian
Society spokesperson Chris Dessent, “It’s definitely a bit
rude, but we want to show that vegetarians are sexy.”

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WILL CHINA WELCOME CAPITALIST RUNNING DOGS?

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

HONG KONG––Friends of
Animals president Priscilla Feral on June 17
led about 50 demonstrators in protest outside
the embassy of the People’s Republic of China
in Washington D.C., demanding that U.S.
president Bill Clinton add cruelty to animals to
his list of topics for discussion during a late
June visit to Beijing.
“We have documented evidence that
cruelty to animals is so pervasive and conspicuous
that it must be officially sanctioned,”
Feral said. “Much of the cruelty involves the
mistreatment of companion animals destined
for slaughter.”
The Clinton administration did not
respond, amid conflicting indications of shifting
Chinese views about dogs and petkeeping.

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Dr. Spock’s last kindness

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

NEW YORK––Humane childrearing
advocate Benjamin Spock, M.D., left
some of his most important advice for last:
“We now know that there are harmful
effects of a meaty diet,” he stated in the
seventh and last edition of Baby And Child
Care produced under his direct supervision.
“Children can get plenty of protein and iron
from vegetables, beans, and other plant
foods that avoid the fat and cholesterol that
are in animal products.”
Spock also rejected milk.
“I no longer recommend dairy
products after the age of two years,” the new
edition of Baby And Child Care advises.
“Other calcium sources offer many advantages
that dairy products do not have.”
If parents are reluctant to become
vegetarians or vegans, Spock urged them “to
explore vegetarian meals and to serve as
many meatless meals as possible.”

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