Cock & bull stories

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 2004:

Oklahoma cockfighting ban upheld

The Oklahoma Supreme Court on March 30, 2004 upheld the
constitutionality of the initiative ban on cockfighting that was
approved by state voters in 2002. Chief Justice Joseph M. Watt and
six other justices ratified the verdict, while two abstained.
The ban passed by a margin of 125,000 votes, but local
judges in 27 counties then ruled that the initiative was
“unconstitutionally vague” and “unjustly deprived cockfighters of
their property.” The Oklahoma Supreme Court rejected both
contentions.
“Next it will be hunting, fishing and rodeos,” complained
state senator Frank Shurden. Shurden for the past two years has
pushed a bill to reduce the penalties for cockfighting from felonies
to misdemeanors.

Bullfight protesters beaten by cops

Members of Corporacion RAYA, also known as Red de Ayuda los
Animales, of Medallin, Colombia, were on February 28 beaten by
police during a protest against bullfighting for the second time in a
month.
“As happened on February 7, the anti-riot squad took
advantage of their jobs and hit the marchers,” an activist calling
herself “Girl From Mars” e-mailed to
<www.hsi-animalia@lists.hsus.org>, an electronic bulletin board
maintained by the Humane Society of the U.S.
“A 15-year-old boy was seriously injured in his eye and was
kept prisoner for about five hours, and so was a 17-year-old girl,”
the report added.

Bullfighting arena built in Beijing

South China Morning Post correspondent David Fang on March 13
reported that “A 3,000-seat bull ring, Asia’s biggest, is nearing
completion in the Daxing district of Beijing, next to the Beijing
Wildlife Park.”
Jiao Shenhai of the Daxing tourist bureau told Fang that the
ring was to host both Spanish-style bullfights and U.S.-style rodeo,
but outbreaks of mad cow disease in Spain had blocked the import of
Spanish fighting bulls.
“Communist China is quick to adopt any vice from any
culture,” commented Chinese animal advocate Peter Li, now teaching
at the Universiy of Houston.
Disagreed Peking University School of Journal-ism &
Communication professor Guan Sijie, “Chinese see the bull as
industrious, honest, and good friends. I don’t think Chinese
people will accept bullfighting.”

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