WWF cofounder Russell Train, 92

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  September 2012:

Russell E. Train, 92, died on September 17, 2012 at his farm in Bozman,  Maryland.  An attorney prominent in Republican politics,  Train was appointed by then-U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower to the bench of the U.S. Tax Court in 1957.  Recalled Washington Post obituarist Juliet Eilperin,  “Around that time, Train and his wife took two safari expeditions to East Africa,” as the then-British colony including Kenya and Tanzania was then known. Read more

South Korea to resume "research whaling"

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 2012:

South Korea to resume “research whaling” 

PANAMA CITY, Panama–South Korean whaling commissioner Joon-Suk Kang told the 64th annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission meeting on July 5, 2012 in Panama that South Korea will submit a plan to begin “research whaling” to the IWC

scientific committee in 2013. The “research whaling” would target

minke whales in coastal waters. Joon-Suk Kang said South Korean whalers had been told that they would be allowed to resume whaling after the coastal whale population recovered. Relying on non-lethal studies, Joon-Suk Kang contended “has delayed the proper assessment of the resources.” Read more

Houndsmen are convicted by video in Maine & worried in Indiana

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  June 2012:

Houndsmen are convicted by video in Maine & worried in Indiana

BELFAST,  Maine;  LINTON,  Indiana–A Superior Court jury in Waldo County,  Maine on April 23,  2012 deliberated for less than an hour before convicting Randall Carl of Knox,  46,  of aggravated cruelty for setting four bluetick coonhounds on an illegally trapped and tethered bobcat in February 2009.  The bobcat was killed.     Read more

Sierra Club national board takes stand against body-grip trapping

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  June 2012:

Sierra Club national board takes stand against body-grip trapping

SAN FRANCISCO–The Sierra Club national board of directors on May 19, 2012 adopted a new “Policy on Trapping of Wildlife” which may be the 110-year-old organization’s strongest statement yet against any form of hunting.
States the policy,  “Use of body-gripping devices–including leghold traps,  snares,  and Conibear traps–are  indiscriminate to age,  sex and species and typically result in injury, pain,  suffering,  and/or death of target and
non-target animals.  The Sierra Club considers body-gripping,  restraining and killing traps and snares to be ecologically indiscriminate and unnecessarily inhumane and therefore opposes their use.  The Sierra Club promotes and supports humane,  practical and effective methods of mitigating human-wildlife conflicts and actively discourages the use of inhumane and indiscriminate methods.  The Sierra Club recognizes the rights of indigenous peoples under federal laws and treaties granting rights of self-determination and rights to pursue subsistence taking of wildlife.” Read more

Trapper shoots horse as bait to trap last breeding wolf from Toklat pack

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  June 2012:

Trapper shoots horse as bait to trap last breeding wolf from Toklat pack

DENALI NATIONAL PARK,  Alaska–Hunting guide Coke Wallace, of Healy,  has acknowledged walking an aged horse to the Stampede Trail near the northern boundary of Denali National Park,  shooting the horse,  and setting snares around the carcass.  The snares killed the last known breeding female wolf from the Grant Creek pack–the pack that roams the area made famous by the 1996 book by Jon Krakauer and 2007 feature film Into the Wild,  about the 1992 death nearby of 22-year-old would-be survivalist Christopher McCandless.
The Grant Creek pack,  also called the Toklat West pack,  is among the three wolf packs most often viewed and photographed by Denali visitors.  The pack has been continuously studied since 1939, first by Adolf Murie until his death in 1974,  then by Gordon Haber from 1966 until his death while spotting wolves from a light plane in 2009, and currently by Anchorage conservation biologist and former University of Alaska professor Rick Steiner. Read more

King Juan Carlos, honorary head of World Wildlife Fund/Spain, apologizes for shooting elephant

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 2012:

MADRID–King Juan Carlos of Spain is for
the time being still honorary president of the
Spanish arm of the World Wildlife Fund, as he
has been since it was formed in 1968, but an
April 20, 2012 public apology for participating
in an ill-fated $60,000 elephant hunt in Botswana
did not quell calls for his ouster or
resignation–even from within the pro-hunting WWF.

Read more

WWF/Sweden head wants to cull wolves

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  May 2012:

WWF/Sweden head wants to cull wolves

  STOCKHOLM— Officially opposed to hunting any of the estimated 200 wolves living in Sweden,  World Wildlife Fund/Sweden has been headed since 1988 by Swedish King Carl Gustaf–who in October 2008 urged a wolf cull.  Wolf hunting resumed in Sweden in 2011,  after a 46-year hiatus.  Twenty wolves were killed before Swedish environment minister Andreas Carlgren halted the hunt under pressure from European Union environment commissioner Janez Potocnik. Read more

Ivory sales boost elephant poaching–as predicted

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  April 2012:

    GENEVA,  JOHANNESBURG— Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species secretary-general John Scanlon on February 29, 2012 reportedly expressed “grave concern” that as many as 450 elephants were poached in Bouba Ndjida National Park,  northern Cameroon,  during the first 60 days of 2012.  Earlier,  the Washington D.C.-based Environmental Investigation Agency reported the poaching of as many as 50 elephants a month in the Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania.
Elephant poaching appears to have accelerated following a record number of seizures of illegally trafficked elephant tusks, worldwide,  in 2011,  including 13 seizures of more than a metric ton of ivory,  up from six in 2010.  The tusks confiscated in 2011 came from at least 2,500 elephants.  “Some of the seized tusks came from old stockpiles,  the elephants having been killed years ago,” reported Michelle Faul of Associated Press.  But the leakage from presumably closely guarded ivory stockpiles indicated high-level corruption in the nations of origin.
Ivory poaching exploded across Africa after CITES in July 2008 authorized Botswana,  Namibia,  South Africa,  and Zimbabwe to sell a combined total of 119 metric tons of elephant ivory to China. Read more

Sealing on thin ice

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  April 2012:

 

CAP-AUX-MEULES, Quebec— Seal clubbing and shooting started on March 22,  2012 for Iles-de-la-Madeleine vessels,  five days ahead of schedule,  because ice floes in the Gulf of St. Lawrence were receding so rapidly that Quebec sealers were at risk of finding no seals to kill.
Canadian Fisheries Department area director Vincent Malouin told Canadian Press that only two to five boats from Iles-de-la-Madeleine were expected to hunt seals in 2012. Iles-de-la-Madeleine was allocated a sealing quota of 25,000,  from a total Canadian quota of 400,000,  the same as in 2011,  despite a lack of evident markets for seal pelts since 2010, when the European Union banned seal pelt imports. Read more

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