Protest of bison killing took guts

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1997:

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL
PARK––The Fund for Animals, Biodiversity
Legal Foundation, Ecology Center, Predator
Project, and individual coplaintiffs on
September 23 announced an out-of-court settlement
of a lawsuit against the National Park
Service for maintaining groomed snowmobile
trails in and out of Yellowstone National Park
each winter, which become corridors to
slaughter as bison follow the cleared, packed
routes north into Montana. More than 1,000
bison were shot last winter alone for entering
Montana, where ranchers fear the bison may
reintroduce brucellosis, undoing a long campaign
to eliminate the disease.


The Park Service agreed in the settlement
to prepare an environmental impact
statement on the impact of winter use of
Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks
on wildlife; consult with the U.S. fish and
Wildlife Service about possible harmful
effects to endangered species, including
wolves and grizzly bears; and prepare an
environmental assesssment, investigating the
possibility of closing at least one road segment
to winter use, as a control to study the
effect of snowmobile trail grooming on bison
movement.
The settlement was upstaged somewhat
by activist Delyla Wilson, of Bozeman,
Montana, who on March 23 protested the
bison slaughter by dumping a bucket of rotting
bison guts on a table in front of Montana
governor Marc Raciot, Secretary of
Agriculture Dan Glickman, and Senators
Max Baucus and Conrad Burns, at an open
meeting on Yellowstone bison management
that was attended by about 500 people. Fined
$1,090 and sentenced to 190 days in jail on
August 26 for causing a disturbance and
assaulting Raciot by splattering him with
blood, Wilson immediately appealed, winning
postponement of her jail time pending
the outcome. Further penalties were possible,
as Wilson also faces federal charges for
allegedly assaulting Burns and Glickman,
likewise by splashing them with blood.
Counterattacking, Wilson charged
in papers filed September 22 that the case
against her was overbroad, preventing her
from preparing a specific defense.
A fundraising appeal on Wilson’s
behalf, issued by the Direct Action Defense
Fund of Tucson, was signed by convicted
accessory-after-the-fact to ALF fur farm
arsons Rod Coronado.

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