Joe Lieberman brings a pro-animal record to the U.S. Presidential race

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

WASHINGTON, D. C.––If animal
advocates ever tip the balance in a U.S. Presidential
election, November 2000 could be it.
In a race in which the candidates previously
were distinguished mostly by the
weight of their negatives, the Democratic nomination
of Senator Joseph Lieberman of
Connecticut as Vice Presidential running mate
to Presidential candidate Albert Gore placed on
the ballot the holder one of the best pro-animal
voting records in the present Congress––among
the best ever.
During Lieberman’s current term of
office he has favored 22 of the 25 animal protection
bills that came to a vote, or 88%, and
did not take a position on two of the other three.
Lieberman conflicted with the animal protection
community only in opposing a 1995
amendment to an appropriation bill which
would have axed two space shuttle missions
that included animal research.

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ANIMAL OBITS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

Vigga, 23, a female orca whale captured
off Iceland in 1980, resident at Six Flags
Marine World in Vallejo, California, since
November 1991, died on August 14, reportedly
from a heart ailment. Vigga was the last
orca at Marine World; her longtime companion
Yaka died in October 1997.

Maria, 19, an Atlantic bottlenose
dolphin captured near Sarasota, Florida, and
brought to the West Edmonton Mall in 1985,
died at the mall on August 9. Three other dolphins
remain at the mall, but none will be
replaced when they die, said mall spokesperson
Travis Reynolds.

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HUMAN OBITUARIES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

Usha Mehta, teacher-in-residence
at the Manibhavan Gandhi Memorial Trust in
Gandhi’s former Mumbai home, died on
August 11. Wrote her longtime friend Geeta
Mehta, “Her warmth of love and friendship
were not limited to humans. As a vegetarian
throughout her life, she had a compassionate
heart for animals, wild or domesticated,”
evident in a brief meeting with A N I M A L
PEOPLE at the Gandhi Memorial Trust during
December 1997. Among the last survivors
of Gandhi’s close associates, Mehta in
1942 organized children to help seek Indian
independence from Britain, and helped operate
the underground Indian National
Congress radio station. Recalled Geeta
Mehta, “Eventually she was arrested and sentenced
to four years imprisonment, during
which she was tortured so much that she permanently
lost her appetite for food.” She
went on to become head of the political science
department at the University of Bombay,
joining the Manibhavan Gandhi Memorial
Trust fulltime upon her retirement.

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BOOKS: Animal Rescue: The Best Job There Is

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

Animal Rescue: The Best Job There Is
by Susan E. Goodman
Simon & Schuster (1230 Avenue of the Americas,
New York, NY 10020), 2000. 48 pages, hardcover. $15.00

The generation who grew
up to form and lavishly fund the
animal rights movement first
encountered World Society for the
Protection of Animals international
programs director John Walsh in
1964, via L i f e magazine, the
Weekly Reader, and documentaries
shown in movie theatres between
the features. Animal lovers followed
the efforts of Walsh and a
handful of other intrepid rescuers as
they saved nearly 10,000 animals
who were stranded by rising water
behind a new dam in Suriname.
Many didn’t survive relocation,
biologists learned later.

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BOOKS: LEGAL FORMS & AGREEMENTS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

LEGAL FORMS & AGREEMENTS: Special Edition for Cat & Dog Shelters and Rescue Groups

by M. Ellen Dixon, Esq.

(order c/o Dixon, 234 Canterbury Ct., Blue Bell, PA 19422; 610-239-0357; fax 610-277-3752; <liacob@aol.com>), 2000. 295 pages, paperback; $26.95 including shipping.

In the just under 300 pages of Legal Forms &
Agreements: Special Edition for Cat & Dog Shelters
and Rescue Groups, attorney M. Ellen Dixon hypothetically
describes at least 300 situations commonly
encountered by animal shelters and rescuers which may
end up in court if agreements are not legally secured.
Though most shelters and rescuers long since
learned to use written animal surrender and adoption
contracts, other transactions are often based on little
more than undocumented conversation.

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“BEST OF BREED” FANCIER CHARGED IN MAJOR NEGLECT CASE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

MODESTO, Calif.––Free on
$10,000 bond, Debra Rexelle, 48, whose cat
Ashmanor Duracell was judged best of the
Turkish Van breed on the Cat Fanciers
Association show circuit during the 1998-1999
season, pleaded innocent on August 23 to 13
counts of felony cruelty to animals plus four
related misdemeanors.
On August 10 rescuers and Stanislaus
County officials removed from Rexelle’s
rented home 212 mostly sick or injured cats,
15 of whom died or were euthanized before the
arraignment. Many of the cats endured the
summer Central Valley heat in stacked cages.
Others were in backyard sheds.
The rescue team also found the rotting
remains of at least 50 cats and kittens.

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Hunting, poaching, and the age factor

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

Legal hunters claim that their
behavior markedly differs from that of socalled
“slob hunters” and poachers––but
checking the ages of 211 people charged or
convicted in hunting-related criminal cases
reported by mass media during 1999 and the
first eight months of 2000, ANIMAL PEOPLE
found that illegal hunters show almost
the same age-related behavioral patterns
found by Robert Jackson and Robert Norton
of the University of Wisconsin in their 1977
interviews with more than 1,600 hunters
who were not charged with any offense.

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Hunters become trophies as “boomers” fade away

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 2000:

JOHANNESBURG, HARARE,
WASHINGTON D.C.––Reputedly the oldest
white rhino in the world, with the longest
horn, Long Tom, 36, roams the Thomas
Baines Game Reserve near Grahamstown,
South Africa.
Long Tom is a widely renowned living
symbol of the African wild––and, to
many, of male potence, not least because he
is still siring young. His most recent offspring
was reportedly born on August 22.
The Eastern Cape Nature Conservation
Department hopes the birth will make
wealthy hunters more eager than ever to mount
Long Tom’s head and horn on a wall, or to
grind his horn into a purportedly aphrodisiacal
powder which in Asia is believed capable of
assuring men that they will sire sons.
Because the Eastern Cape Nature
Conservation Department estimates that permission
to kill Long Tom may fetch as much
as $75,000 at auction, he may go to the block
on September 8.

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CAPITALISTS AND THEIR RUNNING DOGS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, September 2000:

Harry Lee Coe, 68, state attorney
for Hillsborough County, Florida, since 1993,
apparently shot himself to death on July 12
after reportedly running up debts of $157,000
by betting on greyhound races.
The Birmingham Race Course i n
Birmingham, Alabama, is reportedly changing
procedures for unjamming a stuck lure to
avoid repetition of a June 21 incident in which
spectators saw a shrieking dog named Randad
suffer electrocution after jumping onto the
electric rail that propels the lure.
Three months after the allegations
came to light, the USDA and Wisconsin
Attorney General’s Office are reportedly still
investigating charges against Philadelphia
Eagles football team scout and Class B animal
dealer Daniel Shonka, of Cedar Rapids,
Wisconsin, who over three years is believed to
have taken more than 850 retired racing greyhounds
on the pretext of running a greyhound
adoption agency, and instead sold them for
$400 each to Guidant Corp., a Minnesota lab
that tests heart pacemakers.

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