Youth for Conservation desnares Tsavo

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

NAIROBI––Youth for Conservation, with the motto “Wildlife Our Heritage,” describes itself as an association of “post-school young persons regardless of race, creed, or gender who abound in conservation interest and wish to perpetuate it.”

Care For The Wild managing director Chris Jordan describes it as “A group of young lawyers, teachers, accountants, and programmers who are too well qualified and not well enough connected to find places right now in the Kenyan economy, who are too much attached to their love of the Kenyan environment to want to leave it and seek their fortune elsewhere. Many of them got their education abroad, and came back,” Jordan emphasizes. “These young people are the future of the nation. Rather than stagnate and wait for the economy to need them, they pitched in and put their talents to work.”

Jordan averes that the YfC members are some of the most dedicated people he’s met in conservation anywhere. For facilities they have only a closet-sized office at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust animal orphanage. Material assets consist of a second-or-third-hand computer, and a newly received grant of $1,000 from the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

Read more

A video vision for Africa

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

NAIROBI––Simon Trevor, 60, “flew to Africa in a light aircraft with his family in 1946,” his curriculum vitae begins. “He was educated in Zimbabwe and South Africa.”

After working on some of the major dam projects along the Zambesi River as a teenager, beginning at Kariba in 1955, Trevor joined the Kenya Wildlife Service at age 20, serving for four years as a game warden at Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks.

What Trevor really wanted to do, though, was make films about animals––especially films that would persuade people to save animals and their habitat. In 1963, therefore, just as kenya was becoming an independent nation, Trevor left KWS to film the international effort to rescue wildlife from the rising water behind the Kariba dam.

Trevor’s first full-length feature film was The African Elephant (1970); he was nominated for an Academy Award.

Read more

A matriarch remembers– by Daphne Sheldrick, M.B.E.

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

People often ask me, “When did you first start fostering orphaned animals?”

The answer is that I started young. I was born in Kenya, and grew up on a highland farm. Throughout my childhood, farmhands brought young animals to our home. The first orphan I cared for on my own was a little duiker antelope called Bushy. I was only three, but I spent all my waking hours with him. Eventually he answered the call of the wild, as all wild creatures must. I wept my first tears for a loved one.

My husband, David Sheldrick, was first warden of Tsavo East National Park, an untamed wilderness which is a haven for wildlife. We lived there from the time the park was created in 1948.

Tsavo was established not for its wealth of wildlife, however, but simply because it was a large chunk of country not suitable for either plowing or grazing. Then, the habitat favored the browsing species, such as elephants and black rhinos, both present in large numbers, as were dik-dik, lesser kuku, and gerenuk. Grazers were few. You couldn’t see anything. An impenetrable wall of bush was broken only by elephant trails.

Read more

Hunting for the truth of animal and land deals

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

BEIJING, NAIROBI––A pending application to sell tigers and a black leopard to a Chinese zoo which has fed live animals to carnivores, filed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by International Animal Exchange Inc., has in common with a dubious land deal involving the William Holden Wildlife Foundation in Kenya that in each case a Hunt brother, from Ferndale, Michigan, allegedly signed key documents.

And the brothers, longtime business partners, have often before been accused of sleazy dealings.

R. Brian Hunt applied on behalf of IAE to send the tigers and leopard to the Beijing Badaling Wild Animal Park, one of several major Chinese zoos named in ongoing international campaigns against live feeding.

Read more

Care For The Wild grows into the mission

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

RUSPER, West Sussex, U.K. ––It would be hard to be more active in international wildlife protection than Care For The Wild on a comparable budget––or to be more obscure, even with offices in seven nations on four continents.

None of the Care For The Wild expenditure of $1.3 million a year goes for show, or for office comfort. The headquarters in retired veterinarian and chairperson William Jordan’s former animal hospital can barely be seen from the street. Most of the staff occupy a converted stable. William Jordan himself and other executives share closet-sized rooms in the downstairs of his Tudor house.

Care For The Wild is perhaps the biggest employer near the crossroads of Rusper, a village whose other landmarks are a medieval church and two 400-yearold pubs. But Rusper, on the outer edge of the London sprawl, isn’t really near anywhere. It is still rural enough, in fact, that abundant rabbits might be prey for a feral leopard or puma repeatedly seen in the neighborhood.

Read more

Moi: “Shoot to kill cattle rustlers.”

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Nairobi––Kenyan president Daniel arap Moi on December 23 ordered police to shoot armed cattle rustlers on sight. Moi spoke at the Shadrack Kimalel Primary School in Baringo, while attending a goat auction held to fund education throughout the district. The sale of 3,029 donated goats fetched nearly $40,000.

Rustling and related massacres among members of the Pokot, Marakwet, Kalenjin, and Jemp tribes of the North Rift district have produced civil unrest which has in turn hurt the development of tourism and oil fields.

Moi issued a similar shootto-kill order pertaining to armed elephant and rhino poachers in 1984. It was invoked as recently as January 2, when Kenya Wildlife Service rangers killed four poachers––three of whom shot back with automatic rifles––just after the poachers killed four elephants in Kora National Park near Garissa.

Read more

People & Projects

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Animal rescue information was scarce after December floods and mudslides that killed at least 30,000 people in Venezuela––but Reuters reported from Tanaguarena on December 23 that one Ricardo Rodrieguez had turned to rescuing animals upon finding no people left alive, and had freed about 80 dogs plus miscellaneous cats, parrots, monkeys, and other species from the muck and rubble. “The animals are given food and water he has hoarded in an abandoned house,” said Reuters. “He gives them to relief teams and soldiers leaving the disaster area, “so they can start a new life.”

Attorneys Katharine Meyer and Eric Glitzenstein, who won Endangered Species Act protection for grizzly bears, Canada lynx, and the Queen Charlotte goshawk in cases funded by various national advocacy groups, have formed their own nonprofit advocacy front, the Wildlife Advocacy Project. Named WAP director was D’arcy Kemnitz, formerly coordinator for the Alliance for Animals and midwest regional coordinator for the Grassroots Environmental Effectiveness Network, sponsored by Defenders of Wildlife.

Read more

Statements

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Said PETA cofounder Ingrid Newkirk of a Little Rock city government plan to divert funds from zoo improvements to buy land for the future Bill Clinton p r e s idential library, “The Little Rock zoo is the worst in the country. The idea that money is going to be taken away from them to fund Clinton’s library is an abomination.” Her remarks were published as far away as China, where officials are sensitive about American criticism of Chinese zoos.

Comedian Richard Pryor, suffering from multiple sclerosis and previously afflicted by severe burns resulting from drug abuse, reportedly sent Christmas cards urging recipients to withhold donations from charities which fund animal research.

Awards & honors

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Albert Einstein, 1879-1955, who said “Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet,” was on December 26 named “person of the 20th century” by Time magazine.

The first-ever Red Cross Award for animal rescue, sponsored by the Wells Fargo Foundation, was recently given to the Pasado’s Safe Haven sanctuary in Sultan, Washington, for calling public attention to the abandonment of thousands of chickens at the financially distressed Amberson Egg Farm in Lake Stevens, Washington, last summer.

Sheila Siddle, cofounder of the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage in South Africa, on November 20 honored Kenyan wildlife photographer Karl Amman with the first-ever Chimfunshi Pal Award for his exposes of the traffic in wild primates as meat. One of those exposes appeared in the March 1996 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE.

Read more

1 413 414 415 416 417 420