Mountain lion mix-up

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

Last October, Predator Project Newsletter extensively
quoted and paraphrased from a letter by Michael Horan of Eagle’s
Nest, New Mexico, protesting the relocation of 13 mountain lions
as part of a study of their population dynamics which has yielded
strong evidence that the species should not be hunted. Horan linked
the relocation to older and ongoing mountain lion killing projects
undertaken to protect livestock.
Various animal protection groups picked up and echoed
Horan’s claims, condensing his account each time, dropping source
identification, and eventually adding appeals for letters of protest to
be addressed to the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.
Then someone, remembering that the original item had been pub-
lished on newsprint, wrongly cited ANIMAL PEOPLE as the
source, although the first issue of ANIMAL PEOPLE hadn’t even
gone to press yet when Horan wrote his letter.

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ANIMAL HEALTH & BEHAVIOR

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

Chinese authorities have begun
purging officials of Shenqui county in
Henan province for collaborating with
Wang Zhiqiang, an entrepreneur who built
a rural empire around a factory that manu-
factured fake veterinary medicines––among
them “antibiotics” made of talcum powder
and cornstarch, and “intravenous solution”
made of monosodium glutamate dissolved
in water. Wang allegedly bought off police
and politicians, held investigators for ran-
som, and tortured witnesses. Federal
authorities finally arrested Wang and shut
down his No. 1 Veterinarian Medicine
Factory, as he styled it, last

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CHILDREN AND ANIMALS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The National Institutes of Health is now distrib-
uting seven sets of Let’s Visit a Research Laboratory Lesson
Plans free to public schools and to anyone else on request.
“Even though the Michigan Humane Society agrees with
legitimate uses of animals in biomedical research,” MHS
lobbyist Eileen Liska told U.S. Senator Carl Levin in a
recent letter of protest, “these are clearly an example of bla-
tantly one-sided pro-animal research propaganda, and as
such are an inappropriate use of tax dollars. The brochures
do not portray the scientific and ethical complexities of ani-
mal research. I have found a disturbing number of factual
errors in the texts. And also please notice how the refer-
ences at the end of each lesson plan are equally one-
sided––especially the frequency with which the National
Association for Biomedical Research and Foundation for
Biomedical Research are referenced. These are special
interest organizations with sizeable budgets for promoting
their viewpoint. There is no justication for allowing the NIH
to use limited federal funds,” supposed to be spent on pro-
moting public health, “to help such special interests.” The
lesson plans are available from Public Inquiries, National
Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Room 15C-05, 5600
Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857.

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Oceans

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The International Whaling Commission commenced
its annual meeting in Kyoto, Japan, on April 19 as a throng of
1,000 demonstrators marched outside to demand an end to the cur-
rent global whaling ban, in effect since 1986. The IWC scientific
committee met during the last week of April to review current data
on whale populations, while the general commission meeting is
set for May 10-14. Japanese whalers, who already kill 300 minke
whales a year under the auspices of a government research pro-
gram, want to resume whaling on a commercial scale. Iceland has
already resumed commercial whaling, after qutting the IWC.

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ANIMAL HEALTH

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

Massachusetts SPCA veterinari-
ans Michael G. Aronsohn and Alicia M.
Faggella recently published protocols for
anesthetizing and neutering 6-to-14-week-
old kittens in the Journal of the American
Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 202,
#1, pp. 53-62.
The USDA announced April 1
that from now on it will require environ-
mental impact statements filed in connec-
tion with animal disease eradication activi-
ties to include identification of any pesti-
cides that might be used; any chemicals
used for sanitation; and a protocol for dis-
posing of carcasses and contaminated
manure and debris.

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Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The Burger King franchise at
Watkins Glen, New York, in February qui-
etly introduced the spicy bean burger sold
by British Burger King outlets. Priced at
$2.29, the vegetarian burger is made from
kidney beans, carrots, onions, potato
flakes, and peppers, breaded and deep
fried, served on a bun with catsup, cheese
(optional), and tomato. Associated Press
quoted the manager as saying six weeks
later, “The demand is unbelievable. People
are coming from all over. There’s not a seat
in the restaurant. They say there are 12 mil-
lion vegetarians in the U.S. If we can kick
into that market, it’s well worth our while.”
According to AP, the spicy bean burger
will be introduced nationally if it remains
popular in Watkins Glen through the end of
the summer.

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$25,000 & up for lifelong care

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

HOUSTON, Texas––Texas A&M University
on March 26 dedicated an animal shelter, of sorts. For an
endowment of $25,000 per cat or dog, and $50,000 per
horse, the Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center
will keep an animal for the rest of his or her life, after the
owner dies. The animals will be used to study how ani-
mals bond to humans and what role facilities and caretak-
ers play in their well-being, according to associate director
Sally Knight. “The center was developed in response to a
real need in the human community,” Knight said, adding
that 25 to 30 animals are already enrolled.

NABT president moves against dissection alternatives

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1993:

RESTON, Virginia –– National Association of Biology
Teachers members’ comments were due April 1 on proposed major revi-
sions to the organization’s 1989 Position Statements on Animal Use. I f
adopted, the revisions would effectively overturn NABT’s policy of encour-
aging teachers to seek alternatives to dissection and vivsection.
The 1989 statement begins, “NABT believes that all biology teachers
should foster a respect for life,” and continues to state in the second para-
graph that, “NABT supports alternatives to dissection and vivisection
wherever possible in the biology curricula. These alternatives must satisfy
the objectives of teaching scientific methology and fundamental biological
concepts.”

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Vivisection

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1993:

A page one expose in The New York Times on March 23 reviewed the mounting evi-
dence that animal testing is not a valid means of measuring human risk from exposure to tox-
ins––especially carcinogens. The Clinton administration is believed likely to reduce governmen-
tal reliance on animal studies in assessing public health risks.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on March 24 lifted a 16-year-old ban on the
use of female volunteers in drug safety testing. Imposed to protect unborn children, the ban had
the effect of exposing women to greater risks from new drugs––and increased the number of
female animals used in developing some drugs.

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