More young men with guns go berserk; Illinois hunter harassment law struck down

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

EUGENE––Kipland P. Kinkel, 15,
was arraigned on June 16 in Eugene, Oregon,
on four counts of aggravated murder, 26
counts of attempted aggravated murder, six
counts of first-degree assault, 18 counts of
second degree assault, and unlawful possession
of a firearm.
Kinkel, who boasted often to classmates
of torturing and killing animals, was
arrested on May 20 at Thurston High School in
Springfield, a Eugene suburb, for alleged illegal
possession of a gun.
Released to custody of his parents,
who both taught at the school, Kinkel allegedly
shot both to death with hunting weapons the
following morning, then massacred classmates
in the school cafeteria.

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Initiative efforts frustrated in Ohio, Oregon

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

Save The Doves on June 9 submitted
almost 140,000 signatures to the Ohio
secretary of state’s office in support of a referendum
measure on the November 1998 ballot
which, if approved, would restore a state
ban on hunting mourning doves––but was
informed on June 30 that only 84,320 signatures
were valid. Save The Doves was given
another 10 days to collect the 16,073 additional
signatures needed to reach the minimum
of 100,393 required to go before the
voters. Ohio first banned dove hunting in
1917. The ban was repealed in 1975, was
restored in 1977, and was repealed again in
1995. If Save The Doves gets enough signatures,
the pro-dove hunting front Ohioans
for Wildlife Conservation has indicated that
it will attempt to legally challenge the petition
format. Ohioans for Wildlife
Conservation appears to have been organized
by the Columbus-based Wildlife Legislative
Fund of America, which initially formed in
response to a 1977 attempt to ban leghold
traps in Ohio via referendum, then expanded
into a national organization with support
from the National Rifle Association.

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DOGFIGHTING RAIDS LEAD TO DRUG BUSTS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

HILLSBOROUGH, N.C.– –
RAS Kennels owner Glenson Rolston Isaac,
29, of Hillsborough, on June 10 became
the first person charged under a 1997 North
Carolina law making dogfighting a felony.
Sheriffs’ deputies and Orange
County animal control officers seized 45 pit
bull terriers from RAS Kennels one day
after Isaac and kennel workers Dwayne
Harrigan, 25, of Durham, and Kelvin A.
Brown, 27, of Miami, were arrested for
possession of an estimated $300,000 worth
of cocaine, found during investigation of a
complaint that the kennel had exceeded the
20-dog zoning limit.

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PET THEFT HITS INDIA

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

“Organized gangs are abducting
pedigreed dogs for breeding and ransom,
spreading terror among the owners
in the southern city of Bangalore,”
S.N.M. Abdi of the Hong Kong-based
South China Morning Post r e c e n t l y
reported from Calcutta––a story which
must have seemed bizarre back in India,
where even dogs of popular breed type
are so abundant at large that anyone who
wants a dog can attract one with just a
piece of bread.
But the Abdi account followed
only a month after The Times of India
described the pampered treatment of the
231 purebreds entered in the 90th annual
Bombay Presidency Kennel Dog Club
show in Mumbai.

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ALL ABOUT MONEY

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

The Internal Revenue Service has
reportedly revoked the nonprofit status of
Adopt-A-Pet, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for
allegedly operating for the “private benefit”
of the direct mailing firm Watson &
Hughey, under a fundraising agreement
signed in 1985, which allowed Watson &
Hughey unlimited use of the mailing list generated
in connection with Adopt-A-Pet promotions,
but did not allow Adopt-A-Pet to
rent or trade names. IRS Form 990 filings
indicate that over the next three fiscal years
Adopt-A-Pet spent 97% of all receipts on further
fundraising. In 1991 Adopt-A-Pet was
among the co-defendants in a series of cases
brought against Watson & Hughey in 22
states for alleged misleading fundraising in
connection with use of sweepstakes appeals.

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Greenpeacers who hung themselves get off

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

A Seattle Municipal Court jury on June 11 acquitted
seven Greenpeace activists of nuisance and obstruction charges for
suspending themselves on ropes from the Aurora Bridge, above the
mouth of Lake Union, to block the exit of pollock fishing vessels en
route to the Bering Sea in August 1997. Pollock depletion is suspected
as the cause of starvation deaths of Stellar sea lions and sea birds in
Alaskan waters. Acquitted were Holly Dye, of uncertain age, and
Sean Gale, 27, of Seattle; Katie Flynn-Jambeck, 25, of Warwick,
Massachusetts; Omi Hodwitz, 20, of Vancouver, British Columbia;
Troy Jones, 36, of Russellville, Kentucky; Kelly Osborne, 29, of
Flower Mound, Texas; and Donna Parker, 34, of Missoula,
Montana. Charges alleged accomplices Stephanie Hillman, L o r i
Mudge, and Joseph Dibbee, all of Seattle, were separately dropped.

CRIME & COUNSELING UPDATE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

The June 1998 ANIMAL PEOPLE editorial, “Crime and
counseling,” pointed out that there is no proven model for preventing
sadistic behavior through psychological counseling, and warned that
SB 1991, a bill pending before the California legislature, was premature
in mandating counseling as a probationary condition in cruelty
cases, since it seemed to imply that a “seek counseling” order might
by itself be an adequate sentence.
On May 26, a week after the ANIMAL PEOPLE editorial
was distributed to all members of the California legislature, Sherry
DeBoer of Political Animals informed us: “Today an amendment was
made to California SB 1991 which makes it an excellent bill from a
prosecutor’s position. Therefore, we are withdrawing our opposition.”
The amended passages now provide:

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U.S. Surgical CEO is not exactly retiring, despite sale

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1998:

NORWALK, Ct.– – U.S.
Surgical Corporation founder and
CEO Leon Hirsch, 70, on May 24
sold the firm to Tyco International
Ltd., in a deal expected to close in
September. Whether the sale will
reduce the role of U.S. Surgical in
anti-animal rights work is uncertain.
“We don’t really anticipate
any effect,” Americans for Medical
Progress director of public affairs
Jacquie Calnan told ANIMAL PEOPLE.
U.S. Surgical personnel founded
AMP, and in 1992 $980,000 of the
$985,000 AMP budget came from
U.S. Surgical, but Calnan said that
“Over the past few years, as AMP
grew and developed a broad base of
support among the research community,
U.S. Surgical gradually reduced its
financial backing. Today,” Calnan
said, “AMP has over 90 corporate and
institutional partners, including U.S.
Surgical. But as of this year,” she
added, “USSC is no longer the majority,
or even the largest, contributor
among AMP’s members.”

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How EU pays “full regard to the welfare requirements of animals”

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1998:

LONDON, BRUSSELS––A year after the 15
European Union member nations on June 18, 1997 signed a
binding protocol requiring them to recognize animals as “sentient
beings,” and to “pay full regard to the welfare requirements
of animals,” the practical value of it remains unclear.
No aspect of the protocol has been backed, as yet,
by tough new international animal care and handling standards.
But neither has the protocol been shoved into a file
drawer and forgotten. Diplomats are dickering daily over a proposed
phase-out of battery caging for laying hens. Negotiations
also continue over livestock transportation requirements.
The outcome on each topic may be much less than
animal advocates seek, and perhaps even expect.

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