FUR

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

Someone used rat poison in late
April to kill more than 17,000 mink at
the Sakhalin Fur Industrial Association fur
farm on Sakhalin Island in the former
Soviet Union. The fur farm claimed a loss
of $2.8 million, although at current world
pelt prices the actual loss was probably
closer to $400,000. Possible suspects
include rival fur entrepreneurs trying to
boost prices for their own pelts by creating
a shortage and simultaneously wiping out a
rival; someone in management attempting
to cash in on the limited insurance cover-
age; and/or disgruntled employees.

Read more

Zoos & Aquariums

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

The Zoological Society of London on April 13
rejected plans by entrepreneur David Laing and New Zoo
Developments Ltd. to build a $55 million walk-through
aquarium and wildlife film theatre on the 36-acre site. The
166-year-old London Zoo, the world’s oldest, has raised
$3.8 million independently, toward the cost of $32.5 mil-
lion worth of renovations it needs to become a captive
breeding facility. Laing said he would try to situate the pro-
posed aquarium and theatre elsewhere in London.
The Pittsburgh Zoo opened an insect gallery on
April 24, featuring a $24,000 video camera that allows visi-
tors to zoom in on particular insects, magnify their view,
and follow them around a terrarium. Nineteen insect species
are featured in the gallery, and are rotated in the magnifica-
tion area.

Read more

Whaling ban holds

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

TOKYO, Japan––The 47th annual meeting of
the International Whaling Commission concluded May 14
with the 1986 ban on commercial whaling still
intact––and Japan and Norway still threatening to follow
Iceland in quitting the treaty that holds the IWC together.
Norway has already announced that it will
resume commercial whaling this summer, risking trade
sanctions from the United States. Meanwhile, Norway
and Japan are already harpooning 100 and 300 minke
whales apiece per year for “research.” The rudimentary
research ends in each nation with the whale meat on
restaurant tables. Claiming that the Southern Hemisphere
minke whale population is up to 760,000 and out of dan-
ger, Japan wants to kill 2,000 a year. The Japanese gov-
ernment is also desperately worried that the IWC will
extend its authority from minkes, the smallest of the great
whales, to smaller cetaceans such as dolphins and porpois-
es. As with the great whales, some species of dolphins
and porpoises have been driven close to extinction by
aggressive huntiing, and public opinion in most of the
developed nations favors protecting them.

Read more

Performing Animals

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

The Louisiana state senate on
May 12 passed a bill to make attending an
illegal dogfight a crime, 33-0, but reduced
the offense from a felony to a misdemeanor,
and cut the maximum penalty from three
years in jail and a fine of $3,000 to one year
in jail and a fine of $1,000. A bill to ban
cockfighting meanwhile remained stalled in
a legislative committee headed by cock-
fighting fan Rep. Raymond Lalonde.

Read more

Agriculture

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

The Food and Drug Admini-
stration held hearings May 6-7 on whether
to approve the sale of milk produced with
the aid of the genetically engineered hor-
mone bovine somatotropin (BST), and if
sale is approved, whether the milk should
be specially labeled. Four chemical
firms––Upjohn, Monsanto, American
Cyanamid, and Eli Lilly––have reportedly
spent $500 million to develop and introduce
BST, which boosts milk production per cow
by up to 20%. BST is opposed by con-
sumer groups concerned about the possible
effects of the drug on human health, which
may include altering the growth rate of
bone and liver cells; animal protection
groups worried that BST may increase the
stress on cows; and dairy farmers anxious
that many of them could be put out of busi-
ness, since BST enables fewer cows to pro-
duce more milk, which is already in over-
supply. The same debate is underway in
Canada, where a multi-department review
of the possible effects of BST is to be com-
pleted later this year.

Read more

Horses and Cattle

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

Senator Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-New York) have reintroduced the Downed Animal Protection Act, as S. 367 and H.R. 559, which would require stockyards to promptly euthanize sick and injured animals. Support for the measure may be addressed to Senators and Congressional Representatives.
The American Horse Protection Association’s sixth annual training seminar for equine cruelty investiga-
tors will be held May 20-21 at College Park, Maryland. Get details from Ellen Foysyth, 202-965-0500.
Norma Bearcroft, president of the Canadian Wild Horse Society, has asked members to approve a resolution to disband the struggling group by year’s end.

Read more

Wildlife

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

Interior Secretary Bruce Babbit announced April
15 that Georgia Pacific, the largest U.S. forest products com-
pany, has agreed to leave at least 10 acres of woods standing
around each colony of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers
found on company land in Arkansas, the Carolinas, Louisiana,
and Mississippi. The deal protects 50,000 acres while allowing
Georgia Pacific to log the remainder of its 4.2 million acres of
southern timber.
The World Wildlife Fund has agreed to hire mem-
bers of the impoverished Hoopa tribe in northern California to
restore logged-out forests and eroded stream beds. The Pacific
Gas & Electric Co. has already provided 30,000 trees to the pro-
ject, which is expected to benefit bald eagles, peregrine fal-
cons, and northern spotted owls.

Read more

Roddick tells AmEx to shed fur

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

WEST SUSSEX, U.K.––Seeking
to build a progressive image, American
Express recently began airing television com-
mercials featuring British cruelty-free person-
al care products entrepreneur Anita Roddick,
whose Body Shop logo has become synony-
mous with conscientious capitalism. The
commercials describe how Roddick roams the
world in search of products whose ingredients
can be harvested from whole and healthy nat-
ural environments, such as the Amazonian
rainforest. It’s great publicity for The Body
Shop as well as for AmEx––and it came at a
price beyond dollars.

Read more

HUNTING

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1993:

The Federation of Ontario
Naturalists reports that 95% of spring bear
hunters in the province are Americans, from
states that ban spring bear hunting. In 1991,
Ontario spring bear hunters killed 6,760 bears,
9% of the estimated provincial population. A
third of the bears were females. Only 30% of
cubs who lose their mothers live to age one.
“All too many Alaska hunters are
lazy, ill-mannered, beer-guzzling, belly-
scratching fat boys, or girls,” Anchorage
Daily News outdoors editor Craig Medred
opined recently, “who want nothing more
than to ride around on their favorite piece of
high-powered machinery until they find some-
thing to shoot full of holes with their high-
powered rifle.” Medred also attacked the

Read more

1 63 64 65 66