AGRICULTURE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, December 1993:

The USDA on November 5
approved the sale of milk produced with the
use of a genetically engineered bovine
growth hormone, bovine somatotropin,
effective when a Congressionally imposed
moratorium expires February 3. In the interim,
the anti-genetic engineering Foundation on
Economic Trends and small dairy farmers are
trying to form a national boycott of dairies that
buy milk from BST users. The potential
impact of BST is indirectly illustrated by newly
released statistics showing California is the top
dairy state in the US., with only 2,000 farms
and 1.2 million cows, compared with 29,000
farms and 1.5 million cows for Wisconsin, the
runner-up. Most Wisconsin farms are family-
run; most California production comes from
mega-scale factory farms, whose cows may
never go outdoors or taste fresh grass. BST is
expected to tilt farm economics further in favor
of the factory farmers.

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Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 1993:

Men who eat a lot of animal fat,
especially the fat from red meat, have more
than two and a half times the risk of develop-
ing prostate cancer than men who eat little or
none, a team of Harvard University and
Mayo Clinic researchers reported in the
October Journal of the National Cancer
Institute. The study investigated the eating
habits of 47,855 men. Over 165,000
American men develop prostate cancer each
year, often losing their sexual function in
consequence; 35,000 American men per year
die of prostate cancer.

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AGRICULTURE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 1993:

A House/Senate conference com-
mittee agreed October 7 to raise the grazing
fee on federal land from $1.86 per animal unit
month to $3.45 over the next three years, and
to increase government supervision of ranching
activities on leased federal land. The higher
fee––still far lower than the going rate for leas-
ing privately owned grazing land––is expected
to sharply reduce the number of cattle and
sheep on the range in 16 western states. Final
approval of the grazing bill is pending.
October 16, both the House and the Senate
voted to eliminate $500 million in subsidies to
the slumping sheep industry. Wool and lamb
prices have fallen to record lows in each of the
past three years. The American Sheep Industry
Association predicted 25% to 30% of U.S.
sheep ranches would go out of business.

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DIET & HEALTH

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1993:

The Clinton administration has
proposed ending the conflict of interest
between the regulatory and promotional
functions of the USDA with respect to the
meat and poultry industry by transfering the
Food Safety and Inspection Service to the
Food and Drug Administration. The FDA
staff of 1,000 now inspects 53,000 non-
meat food producers, drug manufacturers,
and makers of medical equipment, while
the USDA employs 9,000 people to inspect
6,100 meat and poultry processors.
Coincidentally, tainted meat that passes
inspection causes an estimated 9,000
human deaths per year and 6.5 million ill-
nesses. The National Cattlemen’s Associa-
tion, American Meat Institute, and
National Broiler Council oppose the plan.

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WOOFS AND GROWLS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1993:

THE WISE USE WISE GUYS ET AL
George Frampton’s last major task
before leaving the presidency of The Wilderness
Society to become Assistant Secretary for Fish,
Wildlife, and Parks in the Clinton administration
was to preside over the assembly of a 50-page
report called The Wise Use Movement: Strategic
Analysis and 50-State Review. It calls upon the
mainstream environmental movement to distance
itself from radical environmentalism, deep ecolo-
gy, and animal rights, while rebuilding alliances
with farmers and hunters.
The fall 1993 issue of Friends of
Animals’ ActionLine magazine features ANIMAL
PEOPLE editor Merritt Clifton’s “Attack of the
Wise Use Wise Guys,” an investigation of vio-
lence against animals and animal defenders by
members of the self-named “wise use movement.”
It’s $1.95, from POB 1244, Norwalk, CT 06856.
Having run low on friends in Washington D.C.,
Putting People First is relocating this month to
Helena, Montana––PPF president Kathleen
Marquardt’s birth state.

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DIET & HEALTH

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, September 1993:

Violinist Edgar Stanistreet, of
Philadelphia, still performing at 94, attrib-
utes his longevity to “No meat, eggs, milk,
booze, or cigarettes. Milk is for calves.”
The USDA on August 12
unveiled labels for meat, to become
mandatory in October, that include instruc-
tions on cooking to kill toxic bacteria. The
labels were drafted to settle a lawsuit
brought by the parents of a child who died
from tainted meat and the advocacy group
Beyond Beef, whose president, Jeremy
Rifkin, warned he would sue again if the
language isn’t strengthened. Added Farm
Animal Reform Movement president Alex
Hershaft, “The USDA should require that
animal products carry warning labels with
full disclosure of the documented dangers of
meat consumption to human health.”

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Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, July/August 1993:

Thirty of 90 beef slaughterhouses inspected by
the USDA during last winter’s outbreak of E. coli bacterial
poisoning of hamburger were temporarily closed for clean-
up, Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy announced May 27.
Twelve plants were put in a special enforcement program,
with which they must comply or lose USDA certification.
The last of 143 people who were hospitalized during the E.
coli outbreak, 10-year-old Brianne Kiner, was released as
an outpatient from Children’s Hospital in Seattle on June 29.
Stricken after eating a Jack-in-the-Box hamburger on
January 13, Kiner spent 41 days in a coma and lost her
large intestine. Four children died––three in the Seattle area
and one in San Diego.

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Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

The USDA on May 5 announced
that it will begin requiring labels on raw
meat and poultry to include cooking and
handling instructions, explaining how to
prevent health hazards such as the growth of
E:coli bacteria, which in January and
December killed four children who had just
eaten undercooked hamburgers. The label-
ing rules are to be formally proposed by
August 15. The new requirement comes in
settlement of a lawsuit brought by Beyond
Beef and the parents of one of the January
victims. U.S. trade representative Mickey
Kantor meanwhile denied in a series of press
releases and public statements that such
strengthened food labeling laws could be
overturned under that General Agreement on
Trade and Tariffs and/or the North American
Free Trade Agreement, as alleged obstacles
to international commerce. Last year, the
two agreements were invoked to overturn the
use of U.S. dolphin protection legislation to
exclude imports of tuna netted “on dolphin,”
at considerable cost in dolphin lives.

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Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The Burger King franchise at
Watkins Glen, New York, in February qui-
etly introduced the spicy bean burger sold
by British Burger King outlets. Priced at
$2.29, the vegetarian burger is made from
kidney beans, carrots, onions, potato
flakes, and peppers, breaded and deep
fried, served on a bun with catsup, cheese
(optional), and tomato. Associated Press
quoted the manager as saying six weeks
later, “The demand is unbelievable. People
are coming from all over. There’s not a seat
in the restaurant. They say there are 12 mil-
lion vegetarians in the U.S. If we can kick
into that market, it’s well worth our while.”
According to AP, the spicy bean burger
will be introduced nationally if it remains
popular in Watkins Glen through the end of
the summer.

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