HSUS raids the Fund for Animals

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1994:

WASHINGTON D.C.––No one at the
Humane Society of the U.S. was talking––not on
the record––but spring maneuvers apparently
intended to consolidate political influence both
internally and externally may give the group a very
different profile on Capitol Hill. Events of note
included the March 15 resignation of Kenneth
Inglis, considered the most militant animal rights
activist on the board of directors; the hiring of for-
mer North Shore Animal League president David
Ganz, apparently to raise funds in connection with
a new HSUS government relations arm, including
a political action committee; and the wooing away
of virtually the whole political apparatus of the
Fund for Animals, including national director
Wayne Pacelle, attorney Aaron Medlock, and
Ohio lobbyist Bill Long, who had represented both
the Fund and HSUS in recent months.

Read more

SPECTACLES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1994:

Bill Petersen, county commission
chair in Glades County, Florida, is leading
an effort to ban “hog dog rodeos,” in which
dogs are set upon semi-feral pigs in enclosed
arenas. The winner is the owner whose dog
brings down a pig the fastest. Held in Glades,
Highlands, and Hardee counties, “hog dog
rodeos” are popular with hunters, says pro-
moter Roger Vickery.
The World Society for the
Protection of Animals seeks letters protest-
ing the Jaripeo rodeo, held each February 23
in San Matias, El Salvador, in which a clown
bites a calf’s tongue and pulls it back as far as
he can stretch it. Address Lic. Carlos
Hilermann, Presidente, Inst. Salvadoreno de
Turismo, Calle Ruben Dario 619, San
Salvador, El Salvador.

Read more

Diet & Health

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1994:

The Council for Agricultural
Science and Technology reported March 21
that advances in farming methods and the
growing popularity of vegetarianism could
mean a 30% decrease in the amount of land
used for food crops during the next 50 years
even as the global human population doubles.
The 64-page CAST study, commissioned by
the Program for the Human Environment at
Rockefeller University, was authored by
Connecticut Agriculture Experiment Station
agronomist Paul Waggoner, who explained
that the calories and protein produced on pre-
sent cropland are already sufficient to feed 10
billion vegetarians, rather than the five to six
billion people who now eat a diet including
varying amounts of meat.

Read more

AGRICULTURE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1994:

The General Agreement on Trade
and Tariffs will increase the amount of pork
the U.S. can export to Europe to 624,000 met-
ric tons by 1999, six times the 1991 volume.
Drawn by relatively weak U.S. pollution
laws, European hog producers are rushing to
set up U.S. branches, including the Pig
Improvement Co., of Great Britain, the
world’s largest hog breeder, which hopes to
raise 100,000 hogs per year at a site near
Hennessy, Oklahoma. The facility will gen-
erate as much sewage as a town of 170,000
people. A Danish firm is reportedly planning
an even bigger operation: a 600,000-hog con-
finement farm to be sited in Alaska, where
there are virtually no laws pertaining to farm-
related pollution because farming ventures
there have historically failed.

Read more

ZOO NOTES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1994:

Willie B., a silverback gorilla
kept in isolation at the Atlanta Zoo from his
capture in the wild in 1962 until 1988,
became a father on February 9, at the age of
35. The mother of the newborn is Choomba,
age 30, making the couple the oldest to breed
successfully in captivity. The zoo built bigger
gorilla quarters in 1988 to house a 17-member
colony borrowed from the Yerkes Primate
Research Center, also in Atlanta. Hoping to
add Willie B.’s genes to the limited captive
breeding pool, the zoo initially paired him
with much younger females, in the belief they
would heighten his sexual appetite, but he
failed to impregnate any of them, and was
suspected of sterility. He and Choomba were
paired only after they signaled their interest in
each other from separate cages for months.

Read more

Endangered ocean species

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1994:

Russian whaling commissioner
Alexei Yablokov on February 21 confirmed
that Soviet whalers for decades killed far
more whales than they reported to the
International Whaling Commission. For
instance, he said, in the 1960s one ship reported
killing 152 humpbacked whales and 156 blue
whales, but actually killed 7,207 humpbacks,
1,433 blue whales, and 717 right whales, a
species protected by the IWC since 1946.
Another ship killed 1,568 humpbacks and 1,200
right whales during the winter of 1961-1962,
but reported none of the right whales while the
USSR said its entire fleet killed only 270 hump-
backs all year. Two years later the same ship
killed 530 blue whales; the USSR said the fleet
total was just 74. The revelations mean IWC
estimates of whale numbers may be far too high.

Read more

WATSON TRIAL BEGINS; SEA SHEPHERD MAY GET INTO THE SEAL WOOL BUSINESS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1994:

ST. JOHNS, Newfoundland–
Captain Paul Watson of the Sea Shepherd
Conservation Society was confident and perhaps
even exhuberant March 21, after the Canadian
government presented its case concerning four
counts of criminal mischief brought in connec-
tion with a July confrontation between The
Cleveland Amory, Watson’s vessel at the time,
and the Cuban dragnetting vessel Rio Las
Casas. Three of the counts, pertaining to
alleged reckless endangerment of human life,
could bring Watson a life term in prison.

Read more

Editorial: Zoo issue isn’t individual vs. species

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1994:

A unique attempt to cut through mutual mistrust will occur in late April as 10 top
officials of major zoos, aquariums, and species survival plans, five delegates from animal
protection groups, and 14 academics, veterinarians, and journalists––including the Editor
of ANIMAL PEOPLE––gather at the White Oaks Conservation Center, near Jacksonville,
Florida, for a summit organized by the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy, with
the support of the Gilman Foundation.
Zoos and humane advocates have major interests in common, and should be work-
ing together to protect endangered species; improve public knowledge of animals; close
abusive roadside zoos; and perhaps most urgent, deal with the growing problem of wildlife
being bought, bred, and sold as pets by generally unqualified individuals whose ani-
mals––after outgrowing backyard quarters––are frequently either anonymously tossed over
a zoo fence at midnight or left tethered to the front door of an animal shelter.

Read more

McDonald’s agrees to adopt humane code: PRECEDENT RAISES CARE STANDARDS FOR INDUSTRY

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1994:

OAK BROOK, Illinois––McDonald’s, the world’s biggest beef purchaser,
pledged February 16 to issue a statement of humane principles to all the meat and poultry
slaughterhouses that supply the 14,000 U.S. McDonald’s restaurants, with a request that it be
forwarded to all the farmers who supply them. An abbreviated edition of the statement is also
to appear in the 1993 McDonald’s annual report to shareholders.
McDonald’s general counsel and senior vice president Shelby Yastrow agreed to
ratify and distribute the statement in exchange for the withdrawal of a stronger and more spe-
cific statement advanced as a shareholder resolution by Henry Spira of Animal Rights
International and Nanette Coco of the Franklin Research and Development Corporation, rep-

Read more

1 213 214 215 216 217 223