“He ain’t heavy. He’s my brother.”

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK–– National Park Service rangers have
killed 400 wild burros in Death Valley since 1987, but through the intervention of Wild
Burro Rescue, the 1995 quota is zero. It will stay zero for as many years as WBR is able to
rescue the number of burros the NPS would otherwise shoot to prevent ecological damage.
“I got shingles,” said WBR co-founder Gene Chontos, “but we did it,” raising
$23,000 between reaching a deal with the NPS last December and commencing the rescue
on March 18––and then rounding up 20 burros with the help of six mounted wranglers and a
rented helicopter. The team caught 19 burros the first day, with difficulty.

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Fur

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Minneapolis furrier Robert
Zicari recently told Fur Age Weekly read-
ers that he’s trying to get licensing rights
from Walt Disney to promote fur goods bear-
ing the image of Snow White, and “Their
response was not altogether negative. We
have a chance if we put the cost up front.”
Linking Disney to fur would be an unlikely
coup; the 1959 Disney film 101 Dalmatians,
about Cruella DeVil’s attempt to make a
dog-fur coat, preceded a fur sales crash, and
the 1991 re-release of the film in home video
format also coincided with a skid. More is
ahead: Walt Disney Pictures on May 9 hired
Stephen Herek to direct a live edition of 101
Dalmatians, to be produced by John Hughes
and Ricardo Mestres, probably starring
Glenn Close as Cruella. Filming begins in
October. Thank Walt Disney Co. for its his-
torical role in promoting kindness toward
animals and urge it keep high standards at
500 Buena Vista St., Burbank, CA 91521.

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Animal control & rescue

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Flooding
Mid-May flooding stranded and
killed livestock and pets in rural areas of
Louisiana and Missisippi, but populated
areas, protected by levees and drainage sys-
tems, were only lightly hit, Jeff Dorson of
the New Orleans activist group Legislation
In Support of Animals told ANIMAL PEO-
P L E. LISA and the Louisiana SPCA did
some pet rescue in Jefferson Parish, while
Mary Hoffman and Doll Stanley-Branscum
of In Defense of Animals organized a rescue
effort around Grenada, Mississippi. “Even if
the waters recede rapidly, injured and home-
less wildlife and domestic animals will need
assistance,” Stanley-Branscum predicted.

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PETA, Romero court updates

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

The Nevada Supreme Court has
withdrawn their January 27, 1994 reversal
of the $4.2 million libel verdict won by
orangutan trainer Bobby Berosini in August
1990 against PETA, PETA director of inves-
tigations Jeanne Rouch, the Performing
Animal Welfare Society, PAWS executive
director Pat Derby, and dancer Ottavio
Gesmundo. An FBI probe of alleged conflicts
of interest in other Nevada cases found that
8th Judicial District Judge Jack Lehman is an
advisor to the Animal Foundation of Nevada,
a Las Vegas low-cost neutering organization.
Lehman was appointed by Governor Bob
Miller to serve on the three-judge panel that
heard the PETA appeal of the Berosini ver-
dict, after Chief Justice Robert Rose with-
drew and two other justices were occupied

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GROWLS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Wilderness Society president Jon
Roush, who makes $125,000 a year, in
February and March sold $140,000 worth
of old growth timber from an 80-acre tract on
his 763-acre Montana ranch, bordering the
Bitteroot National Forest. “The area he cut,”
Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair
reported in The Nation of April 24, “is less
than two miles from a national wilderness area
and well within the boundaries of the
Salmon/Selway Ecosystem ––the largest com-
plex of wild land in the Lower 48 and home to
elk, black bears, mountain lions, and grey
wolves.” Roush in 1983 successfully sued the
U.S. Forest Service, contending that logging
and roadbuilding would irrevocably harm the
watershed. The roads built then were used to
remove the logs from his own land.

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People

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Esther Mechler, founder of the
low-cost neutering referral service Spay/USA
and the Focus on Animals video library, has
won the first annual Geraldine R. Dodge
Humane Ethics in Action Award, a prize of
$10,000 to be used as the winner sees fit.
Begun in 1990, Spay/USA made circa 1,500
referrals a year through 1993; taken over by
the North Shore Animal League in mid-1993
and now run as part of the NSAL-affiliated
Pet Savers Foundation, it made 8,640 refer-
rals, resulting in 14,002 neutering opera-
tions, during the first three months of 1995.
Dennis White, former head of the
American Humane Association animal pro-
tection division, has left, after 19 years, for
undisclosed personal reasons.

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Fund tries to save bison, mountain goats

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

As ANIMAL PEOPLE went to press, the Fund
for Animals was scrambling to prevent the shooting of
from 80 to 150 bison who had wandered from Yellowstone
National Park into the Gallatin National Forest, north of
West Yellowstone, Montana. Montana state veterinarian
Clarence Siroky said state wardens would try to chase the
bison back into Yellowstone with helicopters, but would
shoot them to prevent the spread of brucellosis, a disease
causing stillbirths in cattle, if that tactic failed. Although
there is no evidence that bison can transmit brucellosis to
other species of cattle under natural conditions, and only a
small portion of the Yellowstone herd is believed to be
infected, Montana officials shot 420 bison who left the
park during the winter.

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Agriculture

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Twelve activists were arrested and
two hurt at Brightlingsea, England, on
April 18, as they failed to halt the export of
1,200 sheep to Belgium, following an April 12
ruling by the High Court that local authorities
had no right to ban live animal exports. The
ruling undid export bans won through a winter
of protest at all major British cattle ports.
Australia’s effort to resume sheep
sales to Saudi Arabia after a four-year hiatus
hit a snag on May 8 when Saudi inspectors
diverted the first cargo of 75,000 sheep to

Jordan because they didn’t think the sheep
were healthy enough to be unloaded at Jeddah.
A second ship carrying 30,000 sheep changed
destinations voluntarily. Australia sold up to
3.5 million sheep a year to Saudi Arabia before
1991, when the frequent arrival of diseased
sheep caused the Saudis to cut off the trade.

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The Cult of Animal Celebrity by Captain Paul Watson

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1995:

Within the animal protection movement, there are
two types of animals: those with individual names and those
without. The movement is accordingly split between advo-
cates for animals with names, and advocates for all the rest.
Free Keiko, free Lolita, free Corky, free Hondo.
These are wonderful and appealing ideals––but not all captive
cetaceans can or should be freed. Not all facilities holding
marine animals are the enemy. And the huge sums raised to
free a few individuals could be more positively directed
toward ending the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of
nameless whales, dolphins, and seals on the world’s oceans.
The amount of money raised for the cause of freeing
marine mammals with names may exceed $45 million a year,
from the thousands raised to aid local seals and dolphins in
distress to the $14 million estimated cost of someday, maybe,
freeing Keiko, the orca star of the film Free Willy!

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