IT WORKS IN SAN FRANCISCO–– WHAT ABOUT MILWAUKEE?

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1996:

MILWAUKEE––Wisconsin
Humane Society executive director Victoria
Wellens isn’t worried about the flak she’s
catching for giving up 19 animal control
contracts over the next year and a half. She’s
been shot at since she was hired in 1994.
Formerly executive director of the
Chistophe Memorial YMCA in Waukesha,
Wellens inherited a dilapidated shelter, a
building fund that wasn’t growing fast
enough to build much soon, a falling adoption
rate, plunging donations, a demoralized
staff, and perhaps the most militant cadre of
critics between New York and San
Francisco–– despite overall intake, adoption,
and euthanasia statistics that couldn’t
have been closer to the U.S. norms.

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I was a fish killer by Steve Hindi

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1996:

I first fished at age five, with my
brother Greg, who is one year younger.
Each of us caught a perch out of a lake in St.
Paul, Minnesota. Fascinated, we watched
the two perch swim around in a small bucket
until first one and then the other died. I don’t
remember what happened to their bodies, but
I know they were not large enough to eat.
Perch are plentiful, and easy to
hook, and are therefore considered to be a
good species for practice fishing.
Many members from both sides of
my family were fishers, as well as hunters,
trappers, and ranchers. A couple of dead
perch didn’t rate much concern. Like most
children, we learned what we were taught,
setting aside whatever qualms we may have
felt. Our mother raised us to care for cats and
dogs, and we regularly took in strays,
despite housing project rules which forbade
it. However, we were told that fish had no
feelings, and we killed them with abandon.

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Editorial: Peace talk

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1996:

One of our cover stories this month deals with the ongoing process of strategic disengagement,
on both sides, from the 200-year-old battle over animal use in laboratory
research––not as a matter of either side abandoning goals, but as a matter of recognizing
that common goals may be achieved more readily if the conflict is less intense.
ANIMAL PEOPLE over the past year has advanced 10 suggestions for strategic
disengagement in a manner which would simultaneously meet the major practical demands
of the animal rights community and the major needs of biomedical research. They are based
largely on inclinations already evident among both activists and researchers.
ANIMAL PEOPLE does not pretend that these suggestions can resolve the
inescapable conflict over the rightness or wrongness of animal use per se. But they might
form a mutually acceptable protocol for progress.

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EDITORIAL: Peace talk

From ANIMAL PEOPLE,  May 1996:


One of our cover stories this month deals with the ongoing process of strategic disengagement
, on both sides, from the 200-year-old battle over animal use in laboratory research ­­not as a matter of either side abandoning goals, but as a matter of recognizing that common goals may be achieved more readily if the conflict is less intense.

ANIMAL PEOPLE over the past year has advanced 10 suggestions for strategic disengagement in a manner which would simultaneously meet the major practical demands of the animal rights community and the major needs of biomedical research. They are based largely on inclinations already evident among both activists and researchers. Read more

Seeking the psychological well-being of primates

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1996:

NEW YORK, N.Y.––Even before Congress in 1985 amended the Animal Welfare
Act to mandate that laboratories are responsible for the “psychological well-being” of nonhuman
primates used in research, Henry Spira may have known that resolving the long impasse
in the 200-year-old debate over the ethics of using animals in biomedical research would
come down to accommodating primate behavior.
No primatologist himself, Spira brought to animal advocacy a background including
a multinational childhood, waterfront union organizing, and 22 years of teaching English
in inner city schools. Throughout, Spira noticed that what most people want most in any
conflict is not the goal itself, but rather, not to lose.
Losing means losing stature in the troop. Loss of stature means loss of security.
Goal-oriented negotiating, Spira realized, means finding a way for both parties to gain
stature: to achieve important objectives without sacrificing principle.
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ISAR, HSUS, Mercy Crusade lawsuits

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

The International Society for Animal Rights on February 28 sued founder and
recently deposed president Helen Jones along with her sometime driver Edward Woodyatt,
both of Clarks Summit, Pennsyvlania, for alleged fraud and conversion of ISAR assets to
personal gain. The bill of particulars against Jones includes 28 purported breaches of fiduciary
duties, involving misrepresentation of financial data, using ISAR funds to purchase alcohol,
abusive behavior toward staff, and bizarre personal conduct, paralleling the accounts
given by former staff in the October 1995 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE.

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Activism

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Robert E. Kazelak, of Hoffman
Estates, Illinois, was charged on March 22
with misdemeanor reckless conduct for
allegedly twice firing a shotgun just over the
head of Chicago Animal Rights Coaliton member
Mike Durschmid six days earlier. Durschmid,
with CHARC president Steve Hindi and
other activists, was on the far side of Illinois
Highway 173, protesting a cage-reared pheasant
shoot at the Richmond Hunt Club in
McHenry County. According to Hindi,
Kazelak “aimed the weapon directly at the
heads of the activists,” making sure he had
their attention before he fired. The incident
was immediately reported to the McHenry
County sheriff’s department, who turned it
over to the Illinois Department of Natural
Resources, who gave it to the McHenry
County State’s Attorney, Hindi said, without
key evidence. The charges were finally filed
only after the shooting drew heavy publicity.

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COURT CALENDAR

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Crimes against humans

Thomas Hamilton, 43, of
Dunblane, Scotland, held permits for
hunting weapons including a shotgun and
two rifles, as well as for the four pistols he
possessed as a target shooter and used on
March 13 to kill 16 five-and-six-year-olds,
along with their teacher, wounding 17 others.
Hunters on the America Online
“Animals and Society” discussion board
nonetheless rushed to deny that Hamilton was
a hunter. Some also argued that Hamilton
was not a “pervert,” since though long suspected
of pederasty, he was never formally
charged with an offense. Hamilton purported
to teach outdoor skills to boys for more than
20 years, trying several times to start youth
clubs after he was ousted as a Boy Scout
leader in 1974 for keeping eight boys
overnight in a freezing van. At one point he
allegedly used his shotgun to threaten a boy’s
mother, but when she called the police she
was told they could do nothing because he
was licensed to have the weapon.

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Fur notes

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

World Traders Inc., a six-store
fur chain operating in Maine and New
Hampshire, has gone out of business.
California antifur activist Molly
Attel asks that letters protesting the sale of
coyote-trimmed coats be sent to H.V.
Moore, CEO, Woolrich Inc., Woolrich,
PA 17779.
Earth 2000 National urges holders
of Bon-Ton credit cards to cut them up
and return them to Bon-Ton president
Timothy Grumbacher in protest of his decision
to lease boutique space in each of the
70 Bon-Ton franchises to Pollak Furs.
Messages may be left for Bon-Ton at 717-
757-7660.

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