Awards & honors

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Albert Einstein, 1879-1955, who said “Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet,” was on December 26 named “person of the 20th century” by Time magazine.

The first-ever Red Cross Award for animal rescue, sponsored by the Wells Fargo Foundation, was recently given to the Pasado’s Safe Haven sanctuary in Sultan, Washington, for calling public attention to the abandonment of thousands of chickens at the financially distressed Amberson Egg Farm in Lake Stevens, Washington, last summer.

Sheila Siddle, cofounder of the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage in South Africa, on November 20 honored Kenyan wildlife photographer Karl Amman with the first-ever Chimfunshi Pal Award for his exposes of the traffic in wild primates as meat. One of those exposes appeared in the March 1996 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE.

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Positions & transitions

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Virologist Harold E. Varmus, 60, director of the National Institutes of Health since 1993, left at year’s end to head the Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center i n New York City. Under Varmus, the NIH budget rose from $10.3 billion to $15.6 billion––but animal use in research continued a 20-year decline, the retirement of nonhuman primates from research use to sanctuaries became almost routine, and the propaganda wars waged against antivivisectionists by his predecessors markedly cooled.

Matt and Mary Kelly in December announced the sale of the Brodie Mountain Ski Resort in western Massachusetts, scene of many vegetarian and animal activist gatherings, to Brian Fairbanks, owner of the nearby Jiminy Peak ski area. “Fairbanks has committed to keep the veggie offerings throughout the food services at Brodie,” Matt Kelly wrote. Three vegetarian events booked for Brodie during 2000 will remain on the calendar.

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How the rich can get richer––and help the poor

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

INDIANOLA, Washington–– Richard Linzer, author of It’s Simple: Money Matters for the Nonprofit Board Member, hadn’t seen the December 1999 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE when he wrote a guest column attacking “unimaginable accumulations of wealth by large nonprofit institutions” while the problems the money was meant to rectify continue.

Linzer was not yet aware that the Animal Rescue League of Boston ended the most recent fiscal year with cash and securities worth $98 million, more than 16 times the ARL program spending; or that Dogs’ Home Battersea, of London, England, had cash and securities worth $67 million, nearly ten times as high as the Dogs’ Home program budget; or that the relatively small Holiday Humane Society in southern California has cash and securities worth $14 million, amounting to $42 in reserve for every dollar it spends.

But Linzer, who advises philanthropists in “Microsoft country” near Seattle, did know about similar situations in other branches of charity.

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Tales from the

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

Bill Wewer, the far-right tax attorney and direct mail fundraiser who formed the Doris Day Animal League in 1986 and the anti-animal rights group Putting People First with his wife Kathleen Marquardt in 1990, was reported dead in San Francisco on April Fool’s Day 1999.

ANIMAL PEOPLE has repeatedly identified Cetacean Freedom Network founder Rick Spill as apparently being a Wewer alter ego, based on clues that Wewer himself provided in a taunting 1997 fax, many eyewitness identifications of photographs of each one as the other, and much other circumstantial and behavioral evidence.

But Spill reportedly appeared during the late November/early December protests against the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle, helping longtime close associate Ben White and others to build sea turtle costumes.

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Individual Compensation

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

The National Humane Education Society paid secretary. treasurer William J. Kropp $146,714; paid president Anna Briggs $40,303; and paid assistant secretary James D. Taylor $34,255. The PRedator Project paid no board members and paid no one more than $50,000. The Sierra Club paid assistant secretary Deborah Sorondo $165,503; paid chair Michael McClosky $151,128; paid executive director Carl Pope $138,103; paid assistant treasurer Louis Barnes $130,461; paid assistant treasurer Hamilton Leong $80,123; paid assistant treasurer Jeffrey Christy $ 37,820 ; paid ex-president Adam Werbach $18,273; and paid president Charles McGrady $13,250. 

WHO GETS THE MONEY? addenda – late filings

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

The financial data below pertains to animal issue-related charities whose IRS Form 990 filings came too late to abstract in our 10th annual “Who Gets The Money?” charts, published in December 1999.

Each charity is identified by apparent focus: A for advocacy, E for education, S for sheltering.

Charities often declare to the IRS a balance of program vs. fundraising and maintenance expense (overhead) which differs from the balance as it would be stated under National Charities Information Bureau guidelines. The % column states each charity’s overhead costs as declared; the ADJ column states those costs as they would appear if the NCIB guidelines were followed. The NCIB recommends that overhead costs should not be more than 40% of total spending.

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Chimp refuge in Ghana hits bumps

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

 

Friends of Animals literature describing disease experiments to which ex-laboratory chimpanzees may have been subjected apparently backfired in December 1999 against FoA plans to relocate chimps from U.S. labs to a newly created sanctuary in Ghana.

 

FoA has been developing the sanctuary on Konklobi, a 163-acre island in Lake Volta, for approximately three years, in cooperation with the Ghana Department of Wildlife and with advisory supervision from Primarily Primates president Wally Swett. The Konklobi project director, Gerald A. Punguse, retired from his former post as chief wildlife officer in Ghana in November 1998.

 

The next step was to be actually obtaining chimps and delivering them to Ghana, to live out the rest of their lives in semi-wild habitat.

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Editorial: Pepsi Gets the Point

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

The statement Pepsi-Cola gave to Garo Alexanian of the Companion Animal Network in late November 1999 was terse, to the point, and just what Steve Hindi of SHARK had demanded from Pepsi since June 1998:

“Pepsi-Cola Company does not sponsor or support bullfighting, nor do we endorse any kind of animal cruelty. Our Mexico City office has told us that Pepsi advertising is in the process of being removed from arenas in Mexico. And in the next few weeks, we will be sending officials from Pepsi headquarters to verify their progress.”

Hindi and SHARK are already verifying Pepsi progress. They verified first that Pepsi signs were removed from the Puebla bull ring, where Hindi took much of his graphic undercover video footage of bulls being tortured in front of Pepsi logos. Vendors in Pepsi aprons are still prominent, selling drinks of all sorts in Pepsi cups, but the signs––visible in every televised bullfight––have disappeared.

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Maddie’s Fund Wants You!

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, January/February 2000:

ALAMEDA, Calif.–– Maddie’s Fund executive director Richard Avanzino on January 3 confirmed that the $200 million foundation is now officially ready to review grant proposals from across the U.S.

Formed as the Duffield Family Foundation in 1994 by PeopleSoft founders Dave and Cheryl Duffield, Maddie’s Fund in 1998 changed to the present name in honor of the Duffield’s late dog Maddie; rededicated itself to the single mission of promoting nokill dog and cat control; and hired Avanzino away from the San Francisco SPCA, where as president 1974-1999 he fulfilled a 10-year plan that brought the city to no-kill dog and cat control in April 1994.

With the Duffields’ help, Avanzino thinks other cities can achieve similar results in half the time––either by following the San Francisco blueprint or by inventing their own.

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