BOOKS: This is Hope & The Ultimate Betrayal

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

This Is Hope: Green Vegans and the New Human Ecology
by Will Anderson
Earth Books c/o John Hunt Publishing
(15200 NBN Way, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214), 2013. 368 pages,
paperback. $22.95;
or download c/o www.thisishopethebook.com

The Ultimate Betrayal: Is There Happy Meat?
by Hope Bohanec with Cogen Bohanec
166 pages, paperback. $19.95, c/o www.the-ultimate-betrayal.com

This Is Hope, by Will Anderson, and The Ultimate Betrayal, by
Hope Bohanec, with her husband Cogen Bohanec, might be described as
long and short versions of the same book. They are structured somewhat
differently, but mostly summarize the same arguments for veganism,
citing many of the same sources.

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Farm Sanctuary names new executive director

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y.––Farm Sanctuary president Gene Baur on
December 16, 2013 introduced Harry P. “Hank” Lynch as new Farm
Sanctuary executive director and chief executive officer. Lynch
formerly held the same positions at the National Maritime Center in
Norfolk, Virginia, following 12 years as president and CEO at Stan
Hywet Hall & Gardens. Built as the private estate of Goodyear Tire &
Rubber Company founder F.A. Seiberling, the estate has been operated
since 1957 as a nonprofit tourist attraction.
Lynch succeeds Allan E. Kornberg, M.D., a vegan pediatrician
who served as Farm Sanctuary executive director 2009-2012. Kornberg has
returned to medical practice.

Transition in Tampa

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

Ian Hallett, director of Hillsborough County Animal Services
in Tampa, Florida since May 2012, was transferred on December 2, 2013
to a management post within the county parks, recreation and
conservation department. Hallett was succeeded on an interim basis by
Hillsborough County code enforcement director Dexter Barge. Previously
deputy director of the Austin Animal Center in Texas, Hallett was hired
in the expectation that he would help Hillsborough County to achieve
no-kill animal control. Instead, Hallett ran into “a string of
problems at the animal shelter,” recounted Mike Salierno of the Tampa
Tribune, including “two disease outbreaks, animals killed who should
not have been, and scathing audits by outside experts.”

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New director in Portsmouth

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

Ann Pitts, formerly development director for the Animal Defense
League of Texas in San Antonio, on October 14, 2013 succeeded Jenn
Austin as executive director of the Portsmouth Humane Society, of
Portsmouth, Virginia. Austin was fired on October 10, 2013 after the
society was fined $1,250 by the Virginia Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services for releasing sterilized feral cats in violation of
the interpretation of current Virginia attorney general Kenneth T.
Cuccinelli II that neuter/return violates a provision of state law
providing that “No person shall abandon or dump any animal.”

Intervention saves Bahamian street dog sterilization project

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

NASSAU, Bahamas––Veterinary protectionism nearly killed a
planned Bahamian street dog sterilization drive called Operation Potcake
2014, but intensive exposure by the Nassau Tribune and intervention by
prime minister Perry Christie appear to have saved it.
The international dog and cat sterilization charity Animal
Balance, the Veterinary Medical Association of the Bahamas, and the
Bahamas Humane Society on December 5, 2013 jointly announced that
Operation Potcake 2014 will proceed in January as originally scheduled.
Street dogs are called “potcakes” in the Bahamas and
elsewhere on English-speaking Caribbean islands after their habit of
licking caked peas and rice from the bottoms of food containers.
Operation Potcake debuted as a ten-day sterilization campaign
organized by Animal Balance on New Providence Island in January 2013.

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Board-level hunter influence and allegations of mismanagement afflict the 143-year-old Cork SPCA

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

CORK, Ireland––The Cork SPCA, one of the oldest in
Ireland, has thanked the pro-hunting Irish Working Terrier Federation
for an August 2013 donation of dog food, and apologized to the
federation for deleting a public thanks on Facebook.
“Unfortunately the post thanking the federation had to be
withdrawn after concerted pressure from a vocal ‘Anti’ minority (the
Irish Taliban),” recounted the Irish Working Terrier Federation web
page.

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Naturewatch founder John Ruane, 61

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

John Ruane, 61, died of lung cancer on December 3, 2013 in
Newent, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Formerly employed in
international marketing, Ruane founded Naturewatch, based in
Cheltenham, England, in 1992, and incorporated the parallel
Naturewatch Foundation a year later. Initially campaigning mostly
against laboratory use of animals, Naturewatch has since 1992 published
13 editions of a Compassionate Shopping Guide spotlighting companies
that no longer do animal testing and those that continue to use animals
in developing new products. “John Henry Draize,” inventor of the
Draize skin irritancy test most often done on rabbits, “died in 1992
and I am certain he has been Lucifer’s guest ever since,” Ruane
famously remarked.

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National SPCA patron Nelson Mandela

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:

 

Nelson Mandela, 95, died on December 5, 2013 at his home in
Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa. Active in the African National
Congress from the introduction of apartheid in 1948, Mandela was
imprisoned from 1962 to 1990, serving 18 of the 27 years at Robben
Island, near Cape Town. Elected president of the ANC in 1991, Mandela
in 1994 became the first president of post-apartheid South Africa,
retiring in 1999.
Withdrawing gradually from public life, Mandela remained
patron-in-chief of the National Council of SPCAs at his death, a post
he had held for nearly 20 years.

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Animal Welfare Board of India bans circus use of elephants

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November/December 2013:
MUMBAI––The Animal Welfare Board of India on November 15,
2013 announced that it will no longer license elephants for circus use,
and will prosecute circuses that use sick, injured, and unlicensed
animals.
The AWBI acted in response to a nine-month investigation by a
team including representatives from the advocacy organizations
PETA/India and Animal Rahat, reported Vijay Singh of the Times of
India.
“PETA/India’s findings will be forwarded to the Central Zoo
Authority for further action,” Singh added.
The Central Zoo Authority in November 2009 decreed that
elephants may no longer be exhibited by zoos and circuses, but had been
unable to enforce the decree against circuses while the Animal Welfare
Board continued to authorize elephant use.
The Supreme Court of India in 2001 upheld a ban on the use of
bears, monkeys, and big cats in circuses. More than 280 lions, 40
tigers, and scores of aging ex-performing bears were transferred to
CZA-accredited Animal Rescue Centres near Agra, Bangalore, Bhopal,
Chennai, Jaipur, Tirupati, and Visakhapatnam. Since many of those
animals are now deceased, some of the Animal Rescue Centre space may
now be converted to house ex-circus elephants.
India has about 3,500 captive elephants, the most of any
nation; a 3,500-year history of elephant use and exhibition; about
28,000 elephants left in the wild, more than half of the total
population of Asian elephants; and the longest record of protecting
both elephants and elephant habitat, beginning about 2,240 years ago.

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