No dolphins in Denver! ACTIVIST CAMPAIGN SUCCEEDS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993

DENVER, Colo.––An astute
media campaign including extensive
advertising in local newspapers and the
April back cover ad in ANIMAL PEO-
PLE paid off big for Animal Rights
Mobilization! on May 13 when the pro-
moters of the proposed Colorado’s Ocean
Journey aquarium dropped plans to
include captive dolphins. It was appar-
ently the first time any major aquarium in
planning anywhere cancelled a marine
mammal exhibit under pressure from an
animal rights group.

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Chicago, New Jersey, Macon: Model animal control programs meet fiscal reality; SHORT-TERM SAVINGS MAY MEAN LONG-TERM TROUBLE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

CHICAGO, Ill., SPRINGFIELD, N.J., and MACON, Ga.–– The financial pres-
sures of the 1990s threaten to undo the model animal population control programs envisioned in
the late 1980s, just as their benefits are beginning to be realized.
The budgetary ax fell first and hardest in Los Angeles, California, where on July 1,
1992, the city closed the public low-cost neutering clinics that helped cut animal control pickups
from 144,000 in 1970 to 87,000 in 1991, even as the estimated city pet population rose by 21%.
Euthanasia rates were cut proportionately. Animal control officials estimated that for every dollar

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What we’ve learned from feral cats

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

SHUSHAN, New York––If the ANIMAL PEO-
PLE headquarters were the space station in Star Trek: Deep
Space Nine, old Bull the former feral cat would be
Constable Odo. Battle-scarred as a pirate, he lived most of
his life in a wrecked car in the slum district of a struggling
Connecticut mill town. He hates and fears humanity. And
he’s the walking refutation of almost everything anyone has
ever believed about tough tomcats.
As ANIMAL PEOPLE publisher Kim Bartlett
puts it, “Bull would be moral by human standards.” Despite
his piratical appearance, he observes rules of conduct gen-
erally believed to be beyond feline comprehension. From
our first introduction to Bull, we’ve been repeatedly con-
founded by his altruism, his rigid respect for law and order,
and his courage in what could only be described as moral
dilemnas.

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If they only knew

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

A recent survey commissioned by the
Connecticut Attorney General found that of 805
randomly selected state residents, 55% said they
would support a charity only if administrative and
fundraising costs were kept below 20% of the
charity’s total budget––a standard most charities
would fail but for accounting rules that allow many
to write off fundraising expenses as “public educa-
tion.” A ceiling of 30% would be more realistic,
and the National Charities Information Bureau sets
the ceiling for accreditation at 40%.

OBITUARIES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

Mycologist Catherine Roberts
died on April 12. Roberts received her
Ph.D. at the University of California at
Berkeley in 1943. A pioneer in affirming
the ethical responsibility of humans toward
animals, Roberts published her book The
Scientific Conscience in 1967. This book
contained one of the earliest criticisms by a
respected scientist of such experiments as
the maternal deprivation studies done on
infant monkeys. Roberts was also author of
many articles on behalf of animals, and
another book, Science, Animals and
Evolution, which appeared in 1980. In this,

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BOOKS: Natural Healing for Dogs and Cats.

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, June 1993:

Natural Healing for Dogs and Cats. B y
Diane Stein, The Crossing Press (P.O. Box 1048,
Freedom, CA 95019; 800-777-1048), 1993, 186 pages,
paper $16.95.
One American in three resorts to alternative health
care methods for some ailments, the New England Journal
of Medicine reported in January. Recognizing the potential
value of some alternative treatments, the National Institutes
of Health recently formed an Office of Alternative
Medicine, with an initial budget of $2 million. Yet the
availability of similar therapies for companion animals has
received relatively little attention. Pat Lazarus raised the
possibility in her 1983 volume Keep Your Pet Healthy The
Natural Way, and a few alternative-oriented veterinarians
such as Richard Kearns have attracted faithful followings,
but perhaps because there are few health food stores for ani-
mals, interest has been comparatively slow to develop.

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Horses and Cattle

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

Senator Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-New York) have reintroduced the Downed Animal Protection Act, as S. 367 and H.R. 559, which would require stockyards to promptly euthanize sick and injured animals. Support for the measure may be addressed to Senators and Congressional Representatives.
The American Horse Protection Association’s sixth annual training seminar for equine cruelty investiga-
tors will be held May 20-21 at College Park, Maryland. Get details from Ellen Foysyth, 202-965-0500.
Norma Bearcroft, president of the Canadian Wild Horse Society, has asked members to approve a resolution to disband the struggling group by year’s end.

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CHILDREN AND ANIMALS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The National Institutes of Health is now distrib-
uting seven sets of Let’s Visit a Research Laboratory Lesson
Plans free to public schools and to anyone else on request.
“Even though the Michigan Humane Society agrees with
legitimate uses of animals in biomedical research,” MHS
lobbyist Eileen Liska told U.S. Senator Carl Levin in a
recent letter of protest, “these are clearly an example of bla-
tantly one-sided pro-animal research propaganda, and as
such are an inappropriate use of tax dollars. The brochures
do not portray the scientific and ethical complexities of ani-
mal research. I have found a disturbing number of factual
errors in the texts. And also please notice how the refer-
ences at the end of each lesson plan are equally one-
sided––especially the frequency with which the National
Association for Biomedical Research and Foundation for
Biomedical Research are referenced. These are special
interest organizations with sizeable budgets for promoting
their viewpoint. There is no justication for allowing the NIH
to use limited federal funds,” supposed to be spent on pro-
moting public health, “to help such special interests.” The
lesson plans are available from Public Inquiries, National
Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Room 15C-05, 5600
Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857.

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The dream that haunts Vic Koppelberger by Donna Robb

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, May 1993:

The dream that haunts Vic Koppelberger came to
him 30 years ago, and changed his life.
“I stood in a room before all the animals I ever
shot,” Koppelberger remembers. “They were lined up and
staring at me. It was my judgement day.”
Koppelberger, now 75, never hunted again.
He had the dream shortly after a disturbing hunt-
ing experience. Using a stuffed owl as a decoy,
Koppelberger and his game warden hunting companion hid
in the woods at the edge of a clearing. The owl, perched on
a stump, attracted crows who dive-bombed the stuffed
enemy. The crows made easy targets.

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