OBITUARIES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Dick Bromley, 75, a longtime
docent for the Bridgeport Zoo, died on
January 20 from complications of prostate
cancer at home in Monroe, Connecticut. A
self-employed consulting engineer, involved
in designing the Hubbel Space Telescope,
Bromley was active in many community
activities, but animals were from boyhood
his most enduring interest. Bromley and his
wife Priscilla, who survives him, were
active participants in the1991-1992 A N IMAL
PEOPLE feral cat rescue project, caring
for seven outdoor cats in addition to their
own five pet cats, four of whom were adopted
through the project. All of the cats remain
alive and well, and Mrs. Bromley continues
to attend them.

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BOOKS: Simon & Schuster Children’s Guide to Birds

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

S i m o n & Schuster Childre n ’s
Guide to Birds, by Jinny
Johnson, with Dr. Malcolm
Ogilvie. Simon & Schuster (1230
Avenue of the Americas, New York,
NY 10020), 1996. 96 pages, illustrated,
$19.95 hardcover.

What gets children interested in
birdwatching––a dull class, a window, and
a bird outside, or a nice big book full of colorful
creatures called titmice and jackass
penguins? Maybe it’s both. Unfortunately,
pages the size of workbooks make this otherwise
excellent basic guide a bit difficult to
conceal, open, in a lap beneath a
desk––and it’s too big to take out into the
field in a pocket, too. But then, children
are more likely to do their early species
identification from indoors, anyway.

BOOKS: Beastly Abodes: Homes for Birds, Bats, Butterflies and Other Backyard Wildlife

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Beastly Abodes: Homes for
Birds, Bats, Butterflies and
Other Backyard Wi l d l i f e, by
Bobbe Needham. Sterling Publishing
Co. (387 Park Ave. South, New York,
NY 10016), 1995. 144 pages, hardcover.
$21.95.

At a glance this looks like just
another book of birdhouses: ornaments for
the garden, never to be occupied by the creatures
they were built for. But though it has
plenty of photos of fancy artistic bird
dwellings, Beastly Abodes also contains an
unexpected wealth of information about
wildlife. Each house comes not only with
plans for building it, but also instructions on
siting it to attract the right creatures. Each is
made with natural or recycled materials that
blend with the surroundings.

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BOOKS: A Cat

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

A Cat, by Leonard Michaels,
illustrated by Frances Lerner
Riverhead Books
(200 Madison Ave., New York, NY
10016), 1995. $14.95

Michaels’ book is like poetry, and
the illustrations are reminiscent of Japanese
brush painting. There is deft economy, an
aptness to both Michaels’ observations and
the fluid strokes adorning the pages.

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BOOKS: The A.B.C. of Cat Trivia

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

The A.B.C. of Cat Trivia
by Rod Evans and Irwin Berent
Thomas Dunne, St. Martin’s Press
(175 5th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010),
1996. $19.95.

This seems rather pricy to me, as
so many of the items are rather well-known.
I suppose it has utility as a reference, if one
frequently gives speeches on cats, but if you
just want to wow a cat-owned date with cat
lore, you would probably do as well to arrive
with a catnip mouse. Included are 200 pages
of superstitions about cats, cruelties to cats
done by historical personages, long lists of
place names and floral designations which
seem to have as little to do with cats as one
always figured.

BOOKS: Cat Love Letters: Collected Correspondence of Cats In Love

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Cat Love Letters: Collected Correspondence of Cats In Love
by Leigh Rutledge, illustrated by Robert Crawford.
Dutton (375 Hudson, New York, NY 10014), 1994. $14.95.

I am afraid this is a women’s book. I cannot imagine a man, even the most aieurophilic
student of romantic correspondence of bygone eras when time and pains were spent on
billet-doux, wading through this. Junior high school girls giggling in gaggles, indulgent
mother-and-daughter teams of all ages, and sentimental elderly women will find it “precious.”
It is cleverly done, clearly designed to be a gift item. My copy came as an anniversary
remembrance, and as a valentine or a birthday gift, it will outlast more passing around than
chocolates, but it is written by cats who knew Martha Stewart, had ancestors who knew the
late Emily Post, and probably had descended from pets of Madame de Sevigne a n d L o r d
Chesterfield, both. Maybe a sigh and a mew is not enough. Perhaps both cats and their people
should make more of a game of corresponding, not just roll the ballpoints under the desk
and fall asleep. Here is a book that reveals the intricate maneuvers that may resolve the most
ardent love problems when pen and paper and purr engage.

BOOKS: Titles to read aloud

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Families of the Deep Blue Sea
by Kenneth Mallory, illustrated by Marshall Peck III
Can We Be Friends?
by Alexandra Wright, illustrated by Marshall Peck III
Do They Scare You?
by Sneed B. Collard III, illustrated by Kristin Kest
Animal Close-Ups series:
The Whale, by Valerie Tracqui,
with photos by Francois Gohier/Jacana
The Fox: Playful Prowler, by Christian Havard
The Wolf: Night Howler, by Christian Havard
All from Charlesbridge Publishing, 1995.
(85 Main Street, Watertown, MA 02172-4411)
$6.95 each, paperback.
Animals In Disguise
by Martine Duprez,
illustrated by Helene Appell-Mertiny
Birds Of The Night
by Jean de Sart, illustrated by Jean-Marie Winants
Charlesbridge, 1995. $14.95 each, hardcover.

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BOOKS: Beyond The Law & Animal Welfare Legislation in Northern European Countries

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

Beyond The Law:
Agribusiness and the Systemic Abuse of Animals Raised for Food or Food Production
by David J. Wolfson.
Coalition for Non-Violent Food, POB 214, Planetarium Station, New York, NY 10024), 1995. 53 pages.
(Send self-addressed catalog envelope with 78¢ postage.)

Animal Welfare Legislation in Northern European Countries: A Study Tour
by Glen H. and Beverly A. Schmidt.
Privately circulated by the American Farm Bureau Federation and the Animal Industry Foundation.

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ISAR, HSUS, Mercy Crusade lawsuits

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, April 1996:

The International Society for Animal Rights on February 28 sued founder and
recently deposed president Helen Jones along with her sometime driver Edward Woodyatt,
both of Clarks Summit, Pennsyvlania, for alleged fraud and conversion of ISAR assets to
personal gain. The bill of particulars against Jones includes 28 purported breaches of fiduciary
duties, involving misrepresentation of financial data, using ISAR funds to purchase alcohol,
abusive behavior toward staff, and bizarre personal conduct, paralleling the accounts
given by former staff in the October 1995 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE.

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