Dog-shooting passé in S.A.

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

KRUGER NATL. PARK;
CAPE TOWN––Word that immunocontraception
seems to work with
female elephants at Kruger National
Park, South Africa, appeared to touch
off a furor over dog exterminations
which continue in lieu of effective animal
birth control in the Cape Town
region, at the far end of the nation.
Perhaps it was only coincidence,
but the engineer of the Kruger
project, South African-born University
of Georgia researcher Richard FayrerHosken,
is also working on immunocontraceptive
methods for use with dogs
and cats, as he explained at the June
2000 Spay/USA conference in
Waltham, Massachusetts.

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New gorilla family ready to visit in Uganda

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

KAMPALA, Uganda
––Uganda Wildlife Authority
tourism manager Lilian Ajarova
on September 19 announced that
a fourth family of mountain gorillas
living in the Bwindi Impenetrable
Forest National Park has
nearly completed two years of
habituation to humans, and will
soon be ready for viewing.
This will boost Ugandan
gorilla tourism revenue by
$50,000 a month, Ajarova estimated.
Uganda allows tourists to
visit mountain gorilla families
only in escorted groups of six,
and has been able to accommodate
only 18 visitors per day.

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AND A WORD FOR DUCKS

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

ATLANTA––Actress Hayley Mills, in person, and rock-and-roll star Paul McCartney, via videotape from London, on September 14 helped the British group Viva!––International Voice for Animals to bring their antiduck meat campaign to America with a press conference in Atlanta and simultaneous protests at shopping centers in 20 other cities.

In Britain, according to Viva! representative Lauren Ornelas, the Viva! campaign against duck meat caused every major supermarket chain to stop selling duck meat, and, she said, “The industry has promised to undertake a major review of duck farming conditions.”

“In the U.S.,” Ornelas stated, “almost 24 million ducks were slaughtered in 1999, up from almost 22 million in 1997.”

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PEOPLE

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

Joe Arpaio, sheriff of
Maricopa County, Arizona, on
September 18 received United Animal
Nations’ Animals’ Choice Award for
forming a Pet Posse to investigate and
ensure prosecution of animal abuse
cases, and for converting an obsolete
jail into a shelter for abused animals,
staffed by female inmate volunteers.
The Alternatives Research
& Development Foundation, a subsidiary
of the American Anti-Vivisection
Society, on October 1 presented its
$5,000 William A. Cave Award t o
MatTek Corporation president John
Sheasgreen for his success in marketing
to major corporations a line of project
safety tests which do not require animal
testing. Cave headed American AV
from 1978 until his death in 1990.

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Level of Abstinence

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

There are two ways to present veganism. One is by implying that a vegan must seek out and avoid all traces of animal products.

The second way is to present veganism by saying that vegans do not have to put pressure on themselves to avoid all byproducts.

Our conversations used to go somewhat like this:

Potential Vegan (PV): Oh, so you’re a vegan. I know some – one else who is vegan. You know, I really think it’s terrible how they treat the animals, but I could never do it.

Vegan: Really, why is that?

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LETTERS [Nov 2000]

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000:

Rochester
On page 8 of the September
200 edition of ANIMAL PEOPLE,
you erroneously attributed to
me the statement, “When you look
for donations, you look for the most
politically correct way to go. And
it’s not politically correct to kill animals.”
That was actually said by
Tom Shannon of Rochester Animal
Control, when he was asked by
Alan Morrell of the Rochester
Democrat & Chronicle about the
decision of the Humane Society of
Rochester & Monroe County not to
renew our long-term contract with
the city to do animal control.
Shannon was among the few Rochester
Animal Services staff kept by
the city when they began operating
animal control on July 1, 2000.

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Million hens killed in Ohio–– twister hits like forced molt

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000

COLUMBUS, Ohio––An estimated
one million battery-caged laying hens died
slowly from thirst, exposure, and starvation
or were reportedly crushed by bulldozers on
October 2 and 3 after two weeks of suffering,
following a September 20 tornado which
destroyed the water-and-feed systems serving
twelve 85,000-hen barns at the Buckeye Egg
Farm complex in Croton, Ohio.
The Croton complex is the biggest
of four owned by Buckeye, the fourth largest
egg producer in the U.S., formerly known as
AgriGeneral LP.
Ohio Department of Agriculture
spokesperson Mark Anthony told Mike
Lafferty of the Columbus Dispatch o n
September 21 that the trapped hens would
have to be killed and buried, burned, or rendered
as promptly as possible.
“And the process has to be done
humanely, too,” Anthony insisted. “These
chickens are not going to die of thirst.”

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What RU-486 means for animals

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000

WASHINGTON D.C.––The pharmacological
race to be first to market a safe,
affordable, easily administered contraceptive
drug for dogs, cats, and nuisance wildlife may
have heated up with the September 28, 2000
decision of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
to allow Danco Laboratories, of New
York City, to market the RU-486 abortion pill.
The Danco formulation, called
Mifeprex, includes five separate tablets, to be
taken in a two-step sequence. The first three
tablets, taken at once, contain mifepristone.
Better known by the chemical index number
RU-486, mifepristone is an androgen steroid
which blocks the production of progesterone, a
hormone required to sustain pregnancy. Two
days after taking the mifepristone tablets, the
user takes two more tablets containing misoprostol,
another hormonal drug which causes
her body to expell the aborted fetal tissue.

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Dogfight on the western front

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, November 2000

BRUSSELS––Germany, France, Italy, and
Britain are battling again in Belgium, and invading
bloody Americans are again ensnarled in the thick of it.
That’s American pit bull terriers this time.
Like the doughboys of World War I and the G.I.s of
World War II, they are said to be over-large, overdosed
on testosterone, and over here, looking for a fight.
This time they are seen as allies of neo-Nazis
and Huns––Attila’s Huns, who ravaged Europe from
434 to 453, when the notoriously reactive Attila’s brain
burst as he celebrated his honeymoon.
The Justice and Home Affairs Council of the
European Union on September 29 heard a German proposal
to ban throughout Europe the breeding or import of
any kind of “fighting dog,” defined as any member of
14 breeds with American pit bull traits. As well as the
American pit bull and Japanese tosa, who have been
banned in Britain and The Netherlands since 1991, the
German proposal would ban Rhodesian ridgebacks,
Neopolitan bulldogs, Staffordshire terriers, English bull
terriers, and bull mastiffs.

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