The bloody British

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

The Countryside Alliance,
near collapse only six months after mustering
250,000 protesters in London to
oppose a ban on fox hunting, issued a
new eight-point mission statement on
September 10. The Alliance goals are
now stated as being to “preserve the freedoms
of country people and their way of
life; lead campaigns for country sports,
their related trades and activities, and the
countryside; and to cooperate closely
with other organizations to promote and
protect the rural way of life.” The
Alliance, depending for numbers upon
uniting small numbers of hunters with
large numbers of nonhunting rural residents,
has struggled from the start with
the conflict between defending hunters’
presumed right to trespass in pursuit of
wildlife and land owners’ wish to control
the activities of trespassers also including
hikers and birdwatchers.

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Sounds of silence

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

Last Chance For Animals on August 17
set up a site called >>www.CoulstonKills
Chimps.com<<, to attack the U.S. Air Force decision
11 days earlier to leave 111 former NASA
chimpanzees in possession of the Coulston
Foundation, a research supplier, while sending
only 30 to the Primarily Primates sanctuary in San
Antonio and none to any other sanctuaries.
According to LCA spokesperson Roy Bodner, “The
president of the Coulston Foundation, Travis
Griffin, on August 19 threatened legal action
against LCA’s web provider if the site was not
removed immediately.” The provider refused, until
and unless advised that the site contained illegal content.
“On August 20 a frustrated Griffin contacted
LCA’s website server’s upstream provider,” Bodner
continued, “and by Griffin’s later admission,
‘objected to their hosting defamatory material,’”
threatening to sue the upstream provider. “That
threat,” Bodner said, “resulted in the website’s
entire server being abruptly removed from the
Internet.” LCA executive director Eric Mindel said
his organization was seeking to place the site with
another server, and was “consulting with our attorney
to examine possible legal action against the
Coulston Foundation.”

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Horse cases

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

Renae Ferguson, 28, of Sylmar, California, and
her father, Edward Perry Reddeck, 56, were arraigned on
August 26 on multiple cruelty counts, while Ferguson’s
mother, Darlene Craig, 48, was arrested at the Los Angeles
courthouse for investigation of similar charges, after equestrian
Cathy Becker-Skaggs investigated the fate of a 15-yearold
mare she had donated to Ferguson for the “West Coast
Riding Academy”––which never existed. Police and
Chatsworth animal control officers said Ferguson and family
apparently got horses via ads soliciting donations for the fictitious
“nonprofit riding school,” then allegedly sold them,
often through ads in the same publications. Six neglected
horses were confiscated, including Becker-Skaggs’ horse,
Libertee, who is reportedly recovering well.
Carolyn and Christopher Carradine, of Santa
Barbara, California, are reportedly suing horse trainer Monty
Roberts, for $100,000 in veterinary costs and other material
damages, alleging that he ruined the health of a thoroughbred
of theirs named Big Red Fox by riding him “to the point of
extraordinary fatigue” in pursuit of an untamed mustang during
the making of a BBC documentary called “The Real Horse
Whisperer” on March 30, 1997. Roberts is author of a bestselling
autobiogrpahy, The Man Who Listens To Horses,
which includes a mention of the incident in an afterword. He
t o l d London Sunday Times reporter Christopher Goodwin
that the Carradines had sued “purely to extract money from
me.” The BBC denied that Big Red Fox had been mistreated.

Man’s companion & friend
Marie Dana, 32, former companion of the late
bathroom fixture maker Sydney Altman, on September 22
filed suit contesting Altman’s will. Altman, who died in
December 1994 at age 60, left his Beverly Hills home and
$350,000 to his dog Samantha, termed his “loving companion.”
Ms. Dana, called his “good friend,” was left a stipend
of $60,000 a year to be Samantha’s caretaker, plus $50,000
cash. Upon Samantha’s death, the will stipulated, “the
arrangement with Marie Dana is cancelled, and I wish the
house to be sold and the money distributed to” People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals and Last Chance for
Animals. Dana is reportedly seeking $2.7 million.

Lobbies
The lobbying group Teaching Animal Awareness
in Legislation, of Connecticut, has disbanded after three
years, unable to raise the funds to keep president Cherylann
H a a s on the job fulltime in the state capitol. Haas instead
has doubled as an assistant animal control officer in Fairfield.
Maine Republican state representative R o b e r t
Fisk and about 150 backers have formed Maine Friends of
A n i m a l s, a lobbying organization which is to seek betterfunded
animal shelters, better trained animal control personnel,
a felony anti-cruelty law, and a ban on leghold trapping.
Fisk’s term of office ends this year.

Fur farm raids, indictments, conviction

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

MADISON, Wisconsin ––Peter D. Young, 20, of Mercer Island, Washington, and Justin C. Samuel, 19, of Snohomish, Washington, were on September 22 indicted on six counts of engaging in anti-animal enter- prise terrorism and extortion, for allegedly releasing mink from four Wisconsin fur farms between October 24 and October 27, 1997, and allegedly attempting to use the threat of further releases to coerce fur farmers into quit- ting the business.

The indictment charges that Young and Samuel, both at large, caused a $200,000 loss to the Smieja Fur Farm of Independence, Wisconson, forcing it to cease operations.

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NOVEMBER STATE BALLOT MEASURES

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

Alaska Ballot Measure 9, the Wolf
Snaring Initative, qualified to face the voters on
August 17, when the Alaska Supreme Court overturned
without comment a May ruling by Superior
Court Judge Ralph R. Beistline that if it passed, it
would infringe upon the Alaska Legislature’s exclusive
right to manage wildlife. Backed by Friends of
Animals, the bill bans all snaring of wolves.
Arizona Proposition 201, the Cockfighting
Initiative, survived a court challenge on
September 22 when Judge Robert Myers of the
Maricopa County Superior Court threw out a suit by
the Arizona Game Fowl Breeders Association which
attempted to invalidate more than 42,000 of the
153,494 signatures that the Arizona Secretary of State
earlier ruled were valid––40,000 more than were necessary
to put the bill to ban cockfighting to a vote. The
well-connected Game Fowl Breeders have killed anticockfighting
bills in agricultural committees of the
Arizona Legislature 23 times since 1954, but may be
out of tricks. The Arizona Star reported on September
3 that an independent poll found 87% of Arizona voters
are opposed to cockfighting. Cockfighting is currently
legal in the U.S. only in Louisiana, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, and Missouri––but Missouri too
may ban it this November.

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Regional aspect of Duffield plan will be controversial

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

CONCORD, Calif.––The most
controversial aspect of Richard Avanzino’s
strategy for using Duffield Family Foundation
funding to build a no-kill nation may prove to
be not his goal but his strategy: trying to do it
city by city, state by state, region by region.
As a tactical blueprint, the regional
approach may build momentum, especially in
California, where Avanzino’s success in San
Francisco is already well known and easily
witnessed. Pressure from local activists, news
media, and surrounding communities may
combine, as Avanzino expects, to force any
holdouts to change their methods.
But the regional strategy may bitterly
disappoint many struggling no-kill organizations
elsewhere. Many are already calling,
faxing, and e-mailing pleas to Avanzino and
to anyone they hope might intercede with him,
including ANIMAL PEOPLE.

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NO FIGHTING, NO BITING OVER THE MONEY

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

CONCORD, Calif.––Richard Avanzino with
Duffield Family Foundation backing may now be ready to “roll,
roll, roll” the concept and tactics of achieving no-kill animal
control across the U.S., but one prerequisite he outlined at the
No-Kill Conference for doing it may be a taller order than
effectively ending pet overpopulation.
“Everybody needs to work together and accept our
core values to get funded,” Avanzino warned. “Our core values
are honesty, integrity, and mutual respect.”
In other words, Avanzino repeated several times, he
wants to end bickering and finger-pointing within communities
among organizations of differing and perhaps even conflicting
philosophies and mandates.

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Crud & sand: CHARC takes a bullfighting lesson by Steve Hindi

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

On the morning of August 22, 1998,
Chicago Animal Rights Coalition members
Greg Hindi and Ike Goetsch attended a bullfighting
school in San Diego, the so-called
California Academy of Tauromaquia, to
receive a free introductory lesson.
The “school,” and the two individuals
who run it, drew our attention via media
reports. Having recently documented the actuality
of 28 recent bullfights with close-up
video, we now hoped to explore the bullfighter
mentality.
Greg and Ike were on time.
Instructors Peter Rombold and Coleman
Cooney came late. There were supposed to be
other students, including some from Mexico,
but only one other person showed up, a young
woman named Patricia, who accompanied one
of the instructors.

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Meatless goes mainstream

From ANIMAL PEOPLE, October 1998:

by Henry Spira, founder, Coalition for Non-Violent Food

It would be difficult to imagine a more
mainstream endorsement of the meatless lifestyle
than came in June 1998 in the latest edition of Dr.
Spock’s Baby and Child Care. The perennial best
seller grabbed national headlines when the world’s
leading pediatrician recommended that children be
raised on a vegan diet.
Yet this is just one among many current
opportunities to inspire the public to adopt the
meatless/less-meat lifestyle.
Recognizing the enormous destruction
caused by meat eating, the Sierra Club has joined
the debate on the negative impact of factory farming.

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